fit as a fiddle


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(as) fit as a fiddle

In good health. Yes, I did have surgery a few months ago, but I'm as fit as a fiddle now. I just saw Eric recently, and he's as fit as a fiddle.
See also: fiddle, fit

*fit as a fiddle

Cliché in very good health. (*Also: as ~.) You may feel sick now, but after a few days of rest and plenty of liquids, you'll be fit as a fiddle. Grandson: Are you sure you'll be able to climb all these stairs? Grandmother: Of course! I feel as fit as a fiddle today.
See also: fiddle, fit

fit as a fiddle

In excellent form or health. For example, He's not just recovered, he's fit as a fiddle. The original allusion of this simile has been lost. Its survival is probably due to the pleasant sound of its alliteration. [Early 1600s]
See also: fiddle, fit

fit as a fiddle

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

fit as a flea

BRITISH
If someone is as fit as a fiddle or as fit as a flea, they are very fit and healthy. Note: In the first two idioms here, `fit' means healthy and full of energy. He was nearly 80 and as fit as a fiddle. He is young enough at 33 and fit as a flea. Note: This expression may originally have applied to a violin player, or fiddler, rather than to a violin, or fiddle. The fiddler had to be fit in order to play all evening at a festival or party. Alternatively, `fit' could mean `suitable' rather than `healthy', so the original meaning may have been `as suitable for its purpose as a fiddle is for making music'.
See also: fiddle, fit

fit as a fiddle

in very good health.
See also: fiddle, fit

(as) ˌfit as a ˈfiddle

(also ˌfighting ˈfit) very healthy and active: After our walking holiday, I came back feeling fit as a fiddle.
See also: fiddle, fit

fit as a fiddle

In excellent health, in good working order. The proverbial likening of human good health to a fiddle dates from 1600 or earlier, but there is no completely convincing explanation of the analogy. It appeared in print in the early seventeenth century and was in John Ray’s proverb collection of 1678. Fit in those days meant “appropriate,” as “fitting” still does, but why a fiddle should be considered especially appropriate is unknown. It was only in the nineteenth century that the meaning of physical fitness was attached to the expression, where it remains today.
See also: fiddle, fit
References in periodicals archive ?
Age Concern Coventry - soon to become Age UK - is encouraging people to join its Fit as a Fiddle programme, which helps those over 50 stay active.
Fit as a Fiddle co-ordinator, Sue Hart, said: "We all need to keep moving.
Flannery admits he feels fit as a fiddle after missing almost all of the Six Nations with Ireland due to a ban and subsequent injury.
GYM chain LA Fitness is as fit as a fiddle with a pre-tax half-year profit of pounds 3.7million - a jump of 34 per cent.
Fit as a Fiddle co-ordinator Sue, aged 56, who lives in Ash Green, said: "We will be delivering truly life-changing benefits to thousands of people across Coventry.