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a firm hand

Strong, unwavering discipline and control. Children need a firm hand growing up—they crave structure and rules, despite their protests to the contrary. With the company's president making a series of brilliant decisions, it seems they finally have a firm hand at the helm.
See also: firm, hand

be a firm believer in (something)

To have a strong conviction that something (stated after "in") is important or worthwhile. I'm a firm believer in resting on the weekends so that I don't get burned out.
See also: believer, firm

be a great believer in (something)

To have a strong conviction that something (stated after "in") is important or worthwhile. I'm a strong believer in resting on the weekends so that I don't get burned out.
See also: believer, great

be on firm ground

To be certain of or comfortable with something. Anna can tutor you—she's on firm ground with diagramming sentences.
See also: firm, ground, on

firm hand on the tiller

Full control over a situation. I felt comfortable knowing that even during this difficult time, he had a firm hand on the tiller.
See also: firm, hand, on, tiller

firm up

1. To cause something to become more physically stable or solid. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." I think we need to firm up the foundation before the whole thing falls over. Now put the mixture in the fridge so it can firm up.
2. To become more physically fit or toned. Yeah, I hired a personal trainer to help me firm up.
3. To recover from a problem or decline. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." It'll take some time for sales to firm up after the economic downturn.
4. To solidify a plan or idea and make it more definite. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." I'll call you tomorrow night to firm up our plans for the weekend, OK?
5. To change or add to a monetary offer, in order to make it more desirable. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." If we firm up our offer, I really do think he'll sign with us.
See also: firm, up

have a firm grip on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to be seizing someone or something with a very tight grasp. The bouncer had a firm grip on me as he led me out of the club. I had a firm grip on the wheel to keep the boat on course during the storm.
2. To possess tight and complete control over someone or something. Now that I have a firm grip on the business, I can begin steering it to the success I know it can achieve. Heed my warning—you need to have a firm grip on this new recruit. He's got talent, sure, but he's reckless!
See also: firm, grip, have, on

hold firm

1. To remain securely adhered (to something). I didn't think the makeshift weld would do the trick, but I'm happy to say that it's holding firm.
2. To remain determined, stalwart, and unyielding, as in one's position or opinion. Though it may be hard, we must hold firm in our pledge to environmental reform.
See also: firm, hold

keep a firm grip on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to maintain a tight grasp on someone or something. The bouncer kept a firm grip on the man as he forced him out of the club. I kept a firm grip on the wheel so that the boat would stay on course during the storm.
2. To maintain strict control over someone or something. The new CEO has so far been keeping a firm grip on the company's direction, much to the chagrin of its investors. You need to keep a firm grip on this new recruit. He's got talent, sure, but he's reckless!
See also: firm, grip, keep, on

stand firm

To remain determined, stalwart, and unyielding, as in one's position or opinion. Though it may be hard, we must stand firm in our pledge to environmental reform.
See also: firm, stand

take a firm grip on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to seize or take hold of someone or something with a very tight grasp. The bouncer took a firm grip on me and led me out of the club. I took a firm grip on the wheel to keep the boat on course during the storm.
2. To gain or exercise tight control over someone or something. After her predecessor allowed the company to wallow in mediocrity for nearly 10 years, the new CEO took a firm grip on the business and steered it to unimaginable success. You need to take a firm grip on this new recruit. He's got talent, sure, but he's reckless!
See also: firm, grip, on, take

take a firm line (on or against something)

To publicly assert one's opinion or defense of or opposition to something without relenting. I know voicing my opinion on this legislation may put my job in jeopardy, but it's time to take a firm line against these discriminatory hiring practices. Though an unpopular opinion, the principal took a firm line on keeping classes separated by gender.
See also: firm, line, take

take a firm stand (on or against something)

To publicly assert one's opinion or defense of or opposition to something without relenting. I know voicing my opinion on this legislation may put my job in jeopardy, but it's time to take a firm stand against these discriminatory hiring practices. Though an unpopular opinion, the principal took a firm stand on keeping classes separated by gender.
See also: firm, stand, take

*firm hand

Fig. [someone's] strong sense of management; a high degree of discipline and direction. (*Typically: exercise ~; have ~; need ~; take ~; use~.) I had to use a firm hand with Perry when he was a child. He had a problem with discipline.
See also: firm, hand

firm something up

 
1. Lit. to make something more stable or firm. We need to firm this table up. It is very wobbly. You need to use a whisk to firm up the egg whites.
2. Fig. to make a monetary offer for something more appealing and attractive and therefore more "solid" and likely to be accepted. You will have to firm the offer up with cash today, if you really want the house. Please firm up this offer if you still want the house.
See also: firm, up

firm up

 
1. Lit. to develop better muscle tone; to become less flabby. I need to do some exercises so I can firm up. You really ought to firm up.
2. Fig. to become more stable or viable; to recover from or stop a decline. The economy will probably firm up soon. I hope that cattle prices firm up next spring.
See also: firm, up

keep a firm grip on someone or something

 and keep a tight grip on someone or something 
1. Lit. to hold on to someone or something tightly. As they approached the edge, Sally kept a firm grip on little Timmy. She kept a tight grip on him. Keep a firm grip on my hand as we cross the street.
2. Fig. to keep someone or something under firm control. The manager keeps a firm grip on all the employees. I try to keep a firm grip on all the accounts.
See also: firm, grip, keep, on

take a firm grip on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to grasp someone or something tightly. The police officer took a firm grip on Fred and led him to the squad car. Mary took a firm grip on the handle and pulled hard.
2. Fig. to gain control of someone or something. You will have to take a firm grip on Andrew. He has a mind of his own. Someone needs to take a firm grip on this department and get it organized.
See also: firm, grip, on, take

be on firm ground

be sure of your facts or secure in your position, especially in a discussion.
See also: firm, ground, on

a firm hand

strict discipline or control.
Often used in the the fuller form, a firm hand on the reins (or the tiller ), this phrase is employing the image of controlling a horse by using the reins (or a boat using the tiller).
See also: firm, hand

be a great/firm believer in something

believe strongly that something is good, important or valuable: My mother was a great believer in horoscopes all her life.The boss was a firm believer in developing strong teamwork.

stand ˈfast/ˈfirm

refuse to move back; refuse to change your opinions or behaviour: The management have stood firm against demands for a pay increase. OPPOSITE: shift your ground
Fast here means ‘firmly fixed’.
See also: fast, firm, stand

be on firm ˈground

be sure about your beliefs, knowledge, etc.; be confident: I don’t know a lot about physics, I’m afraid. I’m on firmer ground with mathematics, which I studied at university.
See also: firm, ground, on

a firm ˈhand

strong discipline and control: What his son needs, if you ask me, is a firm hand!
See also: firm, hand

hold ˈfirm (to something)

(formal) believe something strongly and not change your mind: She held firm to her principles.
See also: firm, hold

take a firm ˈline/ˈstand (on/against something)

make your beliefs known and try to make others follow them: We need to take a firm line on tobacco advertising.They took a firm stand against drugs in the school.
See also: firm, line, stand, take

firm up

v.
1. To become firm or firmer: My vacation plans firmed up, so I bought airline tickets.
2. To cause something, such as a shape or a plan, to become definite or firm: I want to firm up our vacation plans before I call the travel agent. Let's firm our route up and get on the road.
See also: firm, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Keeping this capital investment lower for reuse firms would certainly increase revenues per employee, but the combined deconstruction and reuse retails sales firms employ on average more persons per firm, move more materials by mass per firm (of which more will be commodity materials such as lumber and brick which are lower value per pound than many other building components such as doors, windows, cabinets and fixtures that are the predominant products in building materials reuse retail stores).
An alliance member might be considered the principal in a principal-agent relationship with other member firms. As a principal, a member firm could be sued for accounting services it had nothing to do with, along with the agent-firm that actually provided the services at issue.
This makes it possible for a firm to determine how much it is being paid to take different types of risk, and to decide whether and how it should alter the composition and magnitude of its total risk so as to maximize its value.
When CPAs think about retiring and selling their practices, one of their first questions is "To whom can I sell my practice?" There are two primary answers: Select someone in the firm or bring a likely successor into the firm; or find a third party, such as another firm or sole practitioner.
To cash out of an investment, private equity firms often sell the company to a "strategic buyer." Usually that's an acquiring corporation but, increasingly, another private equity firm or a company backed by another private equity shop.
The arrangement between the CPA firms can be as formal or informal as the parties wish, but the disclosures to clients must be handled carefully.
With sound reason, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act has extended beyond the public arena to envelop the private firm, including the privately held and privately/publicly funded real estate concern.
One other ongoing PCPS effort is their Technical Issues Committee, which acts as the voice for local and regional CPA firms and their clients in the technical standard-setting arena by monitoring emerging guidance and offering comments on proposals.
Turning back to profits, the SIE shows that it is large firms that account for most of the recent profit recovery.
* The CI unit contracted with outside firms to be available on a one-, two-, or three-day turnaround to handle emerging, short-term research and analysis on a continuing, open-ended basis.
While the law firms above have been providing advanced services to a borderless corporate world, the Judicial Reform Council is only now finally updating the Japanese legal system to international levels.
The goodwill portion of the purchase price, on the other hand-the portion not based on the target firm's tangible or identifiable, intangible assets, as the Financial Accounting Standards Board defines it-need no longer be amortized.
Responsibilities: She oversees all of State Street's equity investments and leads a team of more than 50 portfolio managers, analysts, and traders, bringing over 15 years of experience to one of the nation's oldest investment managing firms.
(39.) With regard to securities firms incorporated in the United States, qualifying securities firms are those securities firms that are broker-dealers registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and are in compliance with the SEC's net capital rule, 17 C.F.R.
* MDPs threaten small firms. This was one of Ostertag's main concerns, and we should applaud him for his honesty.