firm

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Related to firmness: firmness of purpose

a firm hand

Strong, unwavering discipline and control. Children need a firm hand growing up—they crave structure and rules, despite their protests to the contrary. With the company's president making a series of brilliant decisions, it seems they finally have a firm hand at the helm.
See also: firm, hand

be a firm believer in (something)

To have a strong conviction that something (stated after "in") is important or worthwhile. I'm a firm believer in resting on the weekends so that I don't get burned out.
See also: believer, firm

be a great believer in (something)

To have a strong conviction that something (stated after "in") is important or worthwhile. I'm a strong believer in resting on the weekends so that I don't get burned out.
See also: believer, great

be on firm ground

To be certain of or comfortable with something. Anna can tutor you—she's on firm ground with diagramming sentences.
See also: firm, ground, on

firm hand on the tiller

Full control over a situation. I felt comfortable knowing that even during this difficult time, he had a firm hand on the tiller.
See also: firm, hand, on, tiller

firm up

1. To cause something to become more physically stable or solid. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." I think we need to firm up the foundation before the whole thing falls over. Now put the mixture in the fridge so it can firm up.
2. To become more physically fit or toned. Yeah, I hired a personal trainer to help me firm up.
3. To recover from a problem or decline. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." It'll take some time for sales to firm up after the economic downturn.
4. To solidify a plan or idea and make it more definite. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." I'll call you tomorrow night to firm up our plans for the weekend, OK?
5. To change or add to a monetary offer, in order to make it more desirable. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "firm" and "up." If we firm up our offer, I really do think he'll sign with us.
See also: firm, up

have a firm grip on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to be seizing someone or something with a very tight grasp. The bouncer had a firm grip on me as he led me out of the club. I had a firm grip on the wheel to keep the boat on course during the storm.
2. To possess tight and complete control over someone or something. Now that I have a firm grip on the business, I can begin steering it to the success I know it can achieve. Heed my warning—you need to have a firm grip on this new recruit. He's got talent, sure, but he's reckless!
See also: firm, grip, have, on

hold firm

1. To remain securely adhered (to something). I didn't think the makeshift weld would do the trick, but I'm happy to say that it's holding firm.
2. To remain determined, stalwart, and unyielding, as in one's position or opinion. Though it may be hard, we must hold firm in our pledge to environmental reform.
See also: firm, hold

keep a firm grip on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to maintain a tight grasp on someone or something. The bouncer kept a firm grip on the man as he forced him out of the club. I kept a firm grip on the wheel so that the boat would stay on course during the storm.
2. To maintain strict control over someone or something. The new CEO has so far been keeping a firm grip on the company's direction, much to the chagrin of its investors. You need to keep a firm grip on this new recruit. He's got talent, sure, but he's reckless!
See also: firm, grip, keep, on

stand firm

To remain determined, stalwart, and unyielding, as in one's position or opinion. Though it may be hard, we must stand firm in our pledge to environmental reform.
See also: firm, stand

take a firm grip on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to seize or take hold of someone or something with a very tight grasp. The bouncer took a firm grip on me and led me out of the club. I took a firm grip on the wheel to keep the boat on course during the storm.
2. To gain or exercise tight control over someone or something. After her predecessor allowed the company to wallow in mediocrity for nearly 10 years, the new CEO took a firm grip on the business and steered it to unimaginable success. You need to take a firm grip on this new recruit. He's got talent, sure, but he's reckless!
See also: firm, grip, on, take

take a firm line (on or against something)

To publicly assert one's opinion or defense of or opposition to something without relenting. I know voicing my opinion on this legislation may put my job in jeopardy, but it's time to take a firm line against these discriminatory hiring practices. Though an unpopular opinion, the principal took a firm line on keeping classes separated by gender.
See also: firm, line, take

take a firm stand (on or against something)

To publicly assert one's opinion or defense of or opposition to something without relenting. I know voicing my opinion on this legislation may put my job in jeopardy, but it's time to take a firm stand against these discriminatory hiring practices. Though an unpopular opinion, the principal took a firm stand on keeping classes separated by gender.
See also: firm, stand, take

*firm hand

Fig. [someone's] strong sense of management; a high degree of discipline and direction. (*Typically: exercise ~; have ~; need ~; take ~; use~.) I had to use a firm hand with Perry when he was a child. He had a problem with discipline.
See also: firm, hand

firm something up

 
1. Lit. to make something more stable or firm. We need to firm this table up. It is very wobbly. You need to use a whisk to firm up the egg whites.
2. Fig. to make a monetary offer for something more appealing and attractive and therefore more "solid" and likely to be accepted. You will have to firm the offer up with cash today, if you really want the house. Please firm up this offer if you still want the house.
See also: firm, up

firm up

 
1. Lit. to develop better muscle tone; to become less flabby. I need to do some exercises so I can firm up. You really ought to firm up.
2. Fig. to become more stable or viable; to recover from or stop a decline. The economy will probably firm up soon. I hope that cattle prices firm up next spring.
See also: firm, up

keep a firm grip on someone or something

 and keep a tight grip on someone or something 
1. Lit. to hold on to someone or something tightly. As they approached the edge, Sally kept a firm grip on little Timmy. She kept a tight grip on him. Keep a firm grip on my hand as we cross the street.
2. Fig. to keep someone or something under firm control. The manager keeps a firm grip on all the employees. I try to keep a firm grip on all the accounts.
See also: firm, grip, keep, on

take a firm grip on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to grasp someone or something tightly. The police officer took a firm grip on Fred and led him to the squad car. Mary took a firm grip on the handle and pulled hard.
2. Fig. to gain control of someone or something. You will have to take a firm grip on Andrew. He has a mind of his own. Someone needs to take a firm grip on this department and get it organized.
See also: firm, grip, on, take

be on firm ground

be sure of your facts or secure in your position, especially in a discussion.
See also: firm, ground, on

a firm hand

strict discipline or control.
Often used in the the fuller form, a firm hand on the reins (or the tiller ), this phrase is employing the image of controlling a horse by using the reins (or a boat using the tiller).
See also: firm, hand

be a great/firm believer in something

believe strongly that something is good, important or valuable: My mother was a great believer in horoscopes all her life.The boss was a firm believer in developing strong teamwork.

stand ˈfast/ˈfirm

refuse to move back; refuse to change your opinions or behaviour: The management have stood firm against demands for a pay increase. OPPOSITE: shift your ground
Fast here means ‘firmly fixed’.
See also: fast, firm, stand

be on firm ˈground

be sure about your beliefs, knowledge, etc.; be confident: I don’t know a lot about physics, I’m afraid. I’m on firmer ground with mathematics, which I studied at university.
See also: firm, ground, on

a firm ˈhand

strong discipline and control: What his son needs, if you ask me, is a firm hand!
See also: firm, hand

hold ˈfirm (to something)

(formal) believe something strongly and not change your mind: She held firm to her principles.
See also: firm, hold

take a firm ˈline/ˈstand (on/against something)

make your beliefs known and try to make others follow them: We need to take a firm line on tobacco advertising.They took a firm stand against drugs in the school.
See also: firm, line, stand, take

firm up

v.
1. To become firm or firmer: My vacation plans firmed up, so I bought airline tickets.
2. To cause something, such as a shape or a plan, to become definite or firm: I want to firm up our vacation plans before I call the travel agent. Let's firm our route up and get on the road.
See also: firm, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Fruit from both experiments were analyzed for fresh mass (FM), flesh firmness, flesh firmness loss (difference between firmness at harvest and after storage), soluble solids content, starch index (SI, 1=full, 9=clear), DMC and watercore incidence.
Quality analysis: Physical properties like firmness and juice weight were determined by adopting the standard methods.
Cucumber mesocarp color was measured using a Minolta Chroma Meter model CR-300 (Minolta Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan) to record the [L.sup.*], [a.sup.*], and [b.sup.*] values of a different lobe of each of the 30 slices used for firmness measurements.
Harnessing the powers of miracle algae Padina Pavonica, gingko biloba, rose and mimosa, it improves suppleness, firmness and elasticity in all ages of skin.
The delegation handed them a message of Syed Ali Gilani that Pakistan should continue to maintain consistency and firmness in its Kashmir policy and play an active role in highlighting the human rights violations in Jammu and Kashmir at international forums, Akbar said.
The paper have appraisal and converse regarding picture firmness, necessitate of firmness, its main beliefs, and module of solidity and a variety of algorithm of illustration compression.
At harvest, consumer preference based on firmness showed that 'Jonagold'/EMLA111, 'Improved Golden'/EMLA7, 'Improved Golden'/EMLA 111, 'Scarlet Gala'/EMLA7, 'Royal Gala'/MM111 and 'William's Pride'/M7A did not differ and were preferred compared to 'Jonafree'/Mark and 'Macspur'/M7A.
At the end of "As Pastor and Brother," Charles Enman gave an assessment of "The Father Who Changed History" which emphasized his luminosity, compassion and moral firmness. He ends by saying, "His human stature seemed beyond cavil anywhere in the temporal world he served with such zealous spiritual devotion."
Four years in development by Monroe, Wis.-based Roth Kase, the handcrafted product possesses the firmness of a slightly aged semi-soft cheese, allowing it to be sliced and shredded easily; a melt-in-the-mouth quality; and a mellow yet tangy taste.
With a futuristic technology called imaging spectroscopy, or multispectral imaging, that uses laser beams to detect the sweetness and firmness of fruit.
Nickel and stainless scrap in the United States and China should be very tight, with Europe showing some firmness in markets overall.
A new brochure from National Starch provides information on how the company's specialty starches enhance the consumer appeal of processed meat products by improving moisture retention, firmness, sliceability and mouthfeel.