fingerprint

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roll (one's) (finger)prints

To capture a copy of one's fingerprints either using ink or some kind of digital scanning device. You're not under arrest, we just want to roll your prints to distinguish them from any others we might find at the crime scene. The immigration department now uses a digital scanner when they roll people's fingerprints, making it much easier to keep track of them within the system.
See also: roll

roll a set of (finger)prints

To capture a copy of someone's fingerprints either using ink or some kind of digital scanning device. You're not under arrest, we just want to roll a set of prints to distinguish them from any others we might find at the crime scene. The immigration department now uses a digital scanner when they roll a set of fingerprints, making it much easier to keep track of people within the system.
See also: of, roll, set
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
CAPS is a generic solution that can be applied broadly to any number of settings where civilians are fingerprinted and photographed, and where the fingerprints and/or photographs are submitted for criminal record checks.
Most citizens believe that when police arrest them they get fingerprinted. Although this generally happens, for various reasons, some officers do not always fingerprint everyone they arrest.
That is exactly how I feel every time I have to go to the county sheriff's office to be fingerprinted prior to the renewal of my permit to carry a concealed weapon.
Current laws permit a voluntary system in which nursing homes can pay to have applicants fingerprinted by a local sheriff.
Sun spokesman Ed Fields said applicants are fingerprinted to allow for their easy transfer from the hotel to casino.
The plaintiffs, including Koreans and Americans living in Japan, had been fingerprinted until the abolition of fingerprinting foreign permanent residents in January 1993, according to the court.