find (oneself) without (someone or something)

(redirected from find without)

find (oneself) without (someone or something)

To realize that one lacks someone or something, often unintentionally or unexpectedly. My husband must have taken the umbrella out of our car because I found myself without one in the midst of that downpour today.
See also: find, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

find oneself without someone or something

to discover that one no longer has someone or something. When I got to the head of the line, I found myself without a cent!
See also: find, without
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
``I live here in the wilderness upon roots and rinds, and may not receive into my dwelling even the poorest wretch that lives, unless it were to save his life.'' The King enquires the way to the next town, and, understanding it is by a road which he cannot find without difficulty, even if he had daylight to befriend him, he declares, that with or without the Hermits consent, he is determined to be his guest that night.
Unsuspecting villagers have dug up and are taking away pieces of the rare find without knowing its value of what geologists say could be a big dinosaur species.
akes Maria realise she is going to find without Liam, and tate of Underworld's auses trouble..
But don't simply choose the cheapest you can find without checking the small print -it could be a false economy if it doesn't give all the cover you need.
In other words, efficiencies actually become extremely difficult to find without a knock-on effect at the sharp end.
Although it functions as a rhetorical device and as such provides the poem with an effective opening line in both Spanish and English, it also articulates the terms of an interrogation of identity that pervades the poems in this bilingual anthology: the investigation will not be conducted in the context of a narrowly defined individual self but in the far wider context of an individual self that looks within only to find without. For as the speaker asks her question, she stands at a window from which she sees women from two continents and various historical periods, all of whom bear her some resemblance and in each of whom she sees some resemblance to herself.
Shows like CSI are a problem if they support a fundamentalist approach to "the evidence," a belief that we can just read the information we find without interpreting or analyzing it.