find fault with (someone or something)

(redirected from find fault with one)

find fault with (someone or something)

To find a problem or issue with someone or something; to judge someone or something harshly. Kristen will be single forever if she keeps finding fault with every man she dates. How could you find fault with this project? It met all of the requirements on the rubric.
See also: fault, find

find fault (with someone or something)

to find things wrong with someone or something. We were unable to find fault with his arguments. Sally's father was always finding fault with her.
See also: fault, find

find fault

Criticize, express dissatisfaction with, as in She was a difficult traveling companion, constantly finding fault with the hotel, meal service, and tour guides . [Mid-1500s]
See also: fault, find

find ˈfault (with somebody/something)

look for faults or mistakes in somebody/something, often so that you can criticize them/it: He’s always finding fault with the children, even when they are doing nothing wrong.I can find no fault with this essay; it’s the best I’ve ever read. OPPOSITE: sing somebody’s/something’s praises
See also: fault, find

find fault

To seek, find, and complain about faults; criticize: found fault with his speech.
See also: fault, find
References in periodicals archive ?
If one can find fault with One Nation Under Therapy, it would be that Sommers and Satel spend too little time on teacher education, save a quotation from Martin Rochester arguing that the nation's history curriculum has become "nonhierarchical, nonjudgmental, [and] nonacademic" to the point, add Sommers and Satel, that" [y]oung people, by design, are [being] kept ignorant of much of their own history and of the virtues of its own unique institutions." The authors almost got it, and then missed it, for their tern "by design" nails the issue: Teacher education is intentionally geared toward mental "health," not to excellence or academic mastery.
'All clubs could find fault with one or two things but overall it's going to be better for the game,' said Collins.
Like sisters, penitents wore a uniform dress, did not use their surnames, curtsied when passing their seniors or superiors, could be dismissed for bad behaviour, observed regular hours of silence, were not permitted to enter others' rooms without permission, were discouraged from talking about their families or their pasts, and were not permitted to find fault with one another.
Some planetary scientists occasionally find fault with one of their most well-known colleagues for saying that a given scientific finding is "not inconsistent with" some provocative interpretation.