filthy

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filthy lucre

Money, in the sense of being a product or source of greed. The phrase is Biblical in origin, and the word "lucre" comes from the Latin word lucrum, meaning "profit." She's always worked to better her community, without caring a bit about the filthy lucre she could make in a different field.
See also: filthy

filthy rich

1. noun A disparaging term for those who are very wealthy. The filthy rich don't care a bit about the rest of us living in poverty.
2. adjective Very wealthy. This invention will make us filthy rich!
See also: filthy, rich

filthy lucre

money. I sure could use a little of that filthy lucre. I don't want to touch any of your filthy lucre.
See also: filthy

filthy rich

 
1. Fig. very wealthy. I wouldn't mind being filthy rich. There are too many filthy rich people now.
2. Fig. people who are very wealthy. The filthy rich can afford that kind of thing, but I can't. I sort of feel sorry for the filthy rich.
See also: filthy, rich

filthy lucre

Money; originally, money obtained dishonestly. For example, She didn't like the job but loved the filthy lucre in the form of her weekly paycheck. This term comes from the Bible (Titus 1:11), where it refers to those who teach wrongly for the sake of money. In time it came to be used loosely, and usually jokingly, for money in general, and in the mid-1900s gave rise to the jocular slang term the filthy for "money." Although both versions may be dying out, the expression filthy rich, for "extremely wealthy," survives.
See also: filthy

a dirty look

or

a filthy look

or

a black look

If someone gives you a dirty look, a filthy look, or a black look, they look at you in a way that shows that they are very angry about something. Tony was being a real pain. Michael gave him a dirty look and walked out of the kitchen. He caught the filthy look his daughter flashed him. Passing my stall, she cast black looks at the amount of stuff still unsold.
See also: dirty, look

filthy lucre

(...ˈlukɚ)
n. money. I sure could use a little of that filthy lucre.
See also: filthy

filthy rich

1. mod. very wealthy. I wouldn’t mind being filthy rich.
2. n. people who are very wealthy. The filthy rich can afford that kind of thing, but I can’t.
See also: filthy, rich

filthy lucre

Money acquired by dishonorable means. The term comes from St. Paul’s Epistle to Titus (1:11), in which he criticizes those who teach things which they ought not “for filthy lucre’s sake.” Later the term came to be used ironically for money in general, even if it had been honestly earned. Perhaps scruples have changed, for the term is heard less often today.
See also: filthy
References in periodicals archive ?
Filthiness Presence of dirt materials, foreign bodies in the product like insects, splinters, grass and hair in the product.
The situation along the road near Wahdat Colony was the worst; an area has been turned into a dumping site, where wild plants have grown, while piles of mud along both sides of the road have added to the filthiness in the area.
Glorifying Dolly's "patched" lifestyle, she repeatedly calls attention to the filthiness (both moral as well as physical) that surrounds Anna.
Salafi preacher and TV anchor Abdallah Badr called on Tuesday to hold a mass protest in front of the actors' union, opposing what he called "filthiness in the name of art."
Part I of the book "Endangered Childhoods and Lost Fortunes: Filthiness and Philanthropy" contains chapters by Matthew Kaiser, Shurlee Swain, Louisa Yates and Marie-Luise Kohlke which analyse childhood in both Victorian and contemporary contexts, using Neo-Victorian literary and visual texts to bring to the fore controversial aspects connected with children and their welfare.
In this phenomenon two interlinked dimensions are manifested, one is related to the health issue, derived from the excessive consumption of alcohol acknowledged by around 80% of the youngsters (Cortes et al., 2007, 2008; GiesyT, 2001; Navarrete, 2004), and another one associated to the social consequences that generates this activity in public areas --neighbours' complaints due to the noise, filthiness, etc (Diaz et al., 2009)--.
So will the procurer say that buys young maidens to use them for filthiness. So will the wicked enchanter who sells his sin.
Heidelberg sees baptism as release from the past and strength for fighting future sin while the Helvetic Confession agrees that baptism releases from sin while enabling one to "be called a son of God; to be purged from the filthiness of sins, and to be endued with the manifold grace of God, in order to lead a new and innocent life" (Beeke & Ferguson, 1999, p.
in Carmarthen She sings: "Take me back to England, And the grey, damp filthiness of ages and battered books, And fog rolling down behind the mountains, On the graveyards and dead sea captains."
There is a small and very nice cafe at the Doha Park in Muharraq, where a few days ago in broad daylight I shouted at a gang of youths because of their filthiness in leaving one of the tables awash with tea, deliberately poured, and filthy wet crumbs left on the floor under the table for the poor staff to clean up.
fabulous as to filthiness', we found the food excellent; varied,
Sounding intoxicating and intoxicated, Harvey's tawdry travelogue of "stinking alleys," "drunken beatings," "the gray, damp filthiness of ages" and "dead sea captains" certainly isn't regal, but it has undeniable character.
Still, the lyrics reveal a love-hate relationship to home, wherever that may be: "Take me back to beautiful England/ and the gray, damp filthiness of ages."
124), and in Surat, the English were accustomed to 'pissing rudely and doing other filthiness against the walls, much to the dislike of the mahometans ...' (quotation from T.
These behaviors were generally labeled as she hui chou'e xian xiang (social ugliness), lie xing (bad behavior), ang zang (filthiness) and xing luan (promiscuity).