fill in

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fill in

1. To provide information or details, usually by actually writing something in a blank space on a test, form, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." Fill in the blank with the correct answer. Ugh, I had to fill in so much paperwork on my first day of work. Make sure you fill in the form completely, or they may reject your application.
2. To substitute for someone or something. In this usage, "fill in" is followed by "for." Can you fill in for me on the conference call? I have to leave early today for a doctor's appointment.
3. To fill a hole or void, especially so something looks more uniform in appearance. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." Your eyebrows are looking a little sparse—can I fill them in? The landscaper is coming today to fill in all these holes in the lawn.
4. To inform one of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." Fill me in—what happened at the party last night? The weekly newsletter is intended to fill in everyone about company policy, but no one reads it.
See also: fill

fill someone in (on someone or something)

to tell someone the details about someone or something. Please fill me in on what happened last night. Please fill in the committee on the details.
See also: fill

fill something in

 
1. to add material to an indentation, hole, etc., to make it full. You had better fill the crack in with something before you paint the wall. You should fill in the cracks first.
2. Fig. to write in the blank spaces on a paper; to write on a form. (See also Fill in the blanks) Please fill this form in. I will fill in the form for you.
See also: fill

fill in (for someone or something)

Fig. to substitute for someone or something; to take the place of someone or something. I will have to fill in for Wally until he gets back. I don't mind filling in.
See also: fill

fill in

[for an indentation, hole, etc.] to become full. The scar filled in after a few months. Will this hole in the ground fill in by itself, or should I put some dirt in?
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fill in

1. Complete something, especially by supplying more information or detail. For example, Be sure to fill in your salary history. It is also put as fill in the blanks, as in We'll rely on Mary to fill in the blanks. Yet another related usage is fill someone in, as in I couldn't attend, so will you fill me in? The first term dates from the mid-1800s; the others from the first half of the 1900s. Also see fill out.
2. Also, fill in for. Take someone's place, substitute for. For example, The understudy had to fill in at the last minute, or I can't come but my wife will fill in for me. Also see fill someone's shoes.
See also: fill

fill in

v.
1. To provide someone with essential or newly acquired information: I didn't receive the information in the mail—could you fill me in? Please fill in the new secretary about our rules.
2. To provide something, especially required information, in written form or on a document: The applicant filled the answers in on the registration form. The students filled in the test forms.
3. To cover completely the bounded surface of something: Fill in all the rectangles on the page with blue ink. The artist filled all the stencils in with pastels.
4. To act as a substitute; stand in: When I was sick, my colleague filled in. The understudy filled in for the sick actor last night.
See also: fill
References in classic literature ?
No one can get over the fence and all the fruits of the earth are destroyed, nothing left but these wild things, these grasses.
It was filled with friandises, with luscious and toothsome bits--the finest of fruits, pates, a rare bottle or two, delicious syrups, and bonbons in abundance.
While, however, these manifestations of weakness were exhibited by the young and vain of the party, the more experienced warriors continued their search throughout both caverns, with an activity that denoted they were far from being satisfied with those fruits of their conquest which had already been brought to light.
We had passed through a great forest on which stood myriads of trees, some gay with blossoms, others rich with fruits.
There's the fruits of promotion now; there's the vanity of glory: there's the insanity of life
In front it had a neat garden-patch, where, every summer, strawberries, raspberries, and a variety of fruits and vegetables, flourished under careful tending.
I paused, and stood over that cowering lad a whole minute in awful silence; then, in a voice deep, measured, charged with doom, I began, and rose by dramatically graded stages to my colossal climax, which I delivered in as sublime and noble a way as ever I did such a thing in my life: "Go back and tell the king that at that hour I will smother the whole world in the dead blackness of midnight; I will blot out the sun, and he shall never shine again; the fruits of the earth shall rot for lack of light and warmth, and the peoples of the earth shall famish and die, to the last man
Across the front of the house, and up the spreading eaves and along the fanciful railings of the shallow porch, are elaborate carvings--wreaths, fruits, arabesques, verses from Scripture, names, dates, etc.
It is chief of this world's luxuries, king by the grace of God over all the fruits of the earth.
It abounded in fruits of almost every description, from the hardy apple of the north to the delicate orange of the south.
In the fair city of this vision, there were airy galleries from which the loves and graces looked upon him, gardens in which the fruits of life hung ripening, waters of Hope that sparkled in his sight.
Holly, mistletoe, red berries, ivy, turkeys, geese, game, poultry, brawn, meat, pigs, sausages, oysters, pies, puddings, fruit, and punch, all vanished instantly.
The fact is, I have been out on your account - not that that is any excuse - for I thought, coming from the country, you might like a little fruit after dinner, and I went to Covent Garden Market to get it good.
In the night they woke to find a great wind blowing and a cold rain falling on them, for it was the beginning of winter, when fruits are ripe.
They always had plenty to eat and drink; because Chee-Chee and Polynesia knew all the different kinds of fruits and vegetables that grow in the jungle, and where to find them--like dates and figs and ground-nuts and ginger and yams.