figure of speech

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Related to figures of speech: simile, parts of speech

figure of speech

A form of expression in language, either spoken or written, that employs nonliteral meaning, unusual construction, or a particular combination of sounds to emphasize or heighten the rhetorical effect. Bob: "Does eating an apple a day really keep doctors away from you?" Doug: "Don't take it so literally, Bob, it's just a figure of speech."
See also: figure, of, speech
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
RK 16.26 is among many other verses that are notable for an overlay of figures based on the sonorous possibilities of language (sabdalamkara) and figures of speech that depend on factors of meaning and perception (arthalamkara).
Charity Afasic, which supports children with speech, language and communication impairments, has produced a booklet with a list of common figures of speech illustrated by cartoons.
People with autism may not understand indirect communication such as figures of speech, body language, tone of voice, and facial expressions.
A recent New York Times article recounts children's persistent use of words and phrases such as "duh," "yeah, right," and "like." The author hypothesizes that these and other related figures of speech have emerged because children need them to help sort through the vagaries, the hype, and even the lunacy that fill the airwaves and thus their lives.
I wish I had a copy of Pushkin's poem "I loved you once" which is said to achieve the intended effect - "wistful resignation half-concealing half- revealing a still smouldering passion" "without having recourse to figures of speech." O it would be clear to you then there could be such a thing - I would leave you a copy.
That is, he treats Locke's figures of speech as though they are a discourse distinct from, and bearing a vexed relation with, the discourse concerning epistemology on which readers normally focus, egregiously supposing 'that philosophy is not a text but a doctrine' (p.
Most writing style guides tell you to make use of analogies, metaphors, similes, and other figures of speech to give your writing life and colour.
Then she deals with the characteristics of Ibn Khafajah's rhetorical style, how frequently the figures of speech are used, and how they are combined with each other.
Bede's earliest works included treatises on spelling, hymns, figures of speech, verse, and epigrams.
The simile is one of the simplest figures of speech, but still has great image-making power.
Mathews, ABC, writes from her communications consulting and training aerie in Phoenix to sigh, "I still cling to the childish belief that editorial writers are more careful about their grammar, syntax, and use of figures of speech (than other writers)." That said, she circled the following sentence in The Arizona Republic and added, "Perhaps that's why I despair when I come across a mistake such as this ...."
Most of us have seen one or the other of the great creative writers toss off apparently effortless but dazzling figures of speech.
He extracted humor from weird figures of speech, big words, and high-sounding expressions, but often delivered himself of shrewd aphorisms, and in this respect was again a model for Mark Twain.
FIGURES OF SPEECH: American Writers and the Literary Marketplace, From Benjamin Franklin to Emily Dickinson.
Figures of speech describing the process of problem-solving often use energy-intensive imagery in which our brains are kept busy "cranking out answers," "grinding away at problems" and "crunching numbers." But new research suggests that mental performance need not be so trying.