fiction


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a polite fiction

A general untruth or falsehood that is accepted in place of the truth to maintain politeness, civility, or stability among a given social group. Our parents' marriage was just a polite fiction in our household up until my youngest sister was off to college. By the time the military junta overthrew the dictatorship, the promise of democratic rule was little more than a polite fiction among the citizens of the country.
See also: fiction

truth is stranger than fiction

Real life is filled such bizarre, absurd, or unlikely events that it can be hard to believe they are not fictional. A piece of metal that had embedded itself in the patient's abdomen from the accident actually deflected the bullet away from any vital organs. I tell you, sometimes truth is stranger than fiction.
See also: fiction, stranger, truth

fact is stranger than fiction

Real life is filled such bizarre, absurd, or unlikely events that it can be hard to believe they are not fictional. A piece of metal that had embedded itself in the patient's abdomen from the accident actually deflected the bullet away from any vital organs. I tell you, sometimes fact is stranger than fiction.
See also: fact, fiction, stranger

Fact is stranger than fiction,

 and Truth is stranger than fiction.
Prov. Things that really happen are harder to believe or more amazing than stories that people invent. Did you see the story in the newspaper about the criminal who attacks people with a toenail clipper? Fact is stranger than fiction! Jill: I can't believe someone's paying 900 dollars for Tom's broken-down old car—it doesn't even run. Jane: Truth is stranger than fiction.
See also: fact, fiction, stranger

truth is stranger than fiction

Real life can be more remarkable than invented tales, as in In our two-month trip around the world we ran into long-lost relatives on three separate occasions, proving that truth is stranger than fiction . This expression may have been invented by Byron, who used it in Don Juan (1833).
See also: fiction, stranger, truth

ˌtruth is stranger than ˈfiction

(saying) used to say that things that actually happen are often more surprising than stories that are invented
See also: fiction, stranger, truth

truth is stranger than fiction

Facts may be more remarkable than an invented story. The phrase first appeared in Byron’s Don Juan (1823)—“‘Tis strange—but true; for truth is always strange,—stranger than fiction”—and has been repeated ever since, often with ironic variations. Mark Twain had it in Pudd’nhead Wilson’s New Calendar (1893), “Truth is stranger than fiction— to some people, but I am measurably familiar with it.” And novelist Margaret Echard wrote, “Truth is not only stranger than fiction but far more interesting” (Before IWake, 1943).
See also: fiction, stranger, truth
References in periodicals archive ?
Fiction, dear folks, tramples reality not due to some inherent power it has but because it empowers us to see beyond the limitations imposed on us by reality.
The short story occupies a central place in the field, so it is quite right that Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction, edited by Mayo Mohs (1971), is mentioned.
American Crime Fiction: A Cultural History of Nobrow Literature as Art.
Despite widespread evidence that fictional models play an explanatory role in science, resistance remains to the idea that fictions can explain.
A pragmatic approach that emphasizes reciprocity between the real world and speculative fiction forms the main emphasis of Speculative Blackness.
In this month's cover story, associate editor Alan Brown and contributor Brittany Logan talk with several innovators who tell us how science fiction informed their work.
She states: "The transition from science to technology in Latin American science fiction is particularly clear in these science-and-technology-heavy tales of the double" (174).
In comparison, Read Write Think defines historical fiction as fiction taking place thirty years or more in the past (http:// www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson404/ HistoricalFictionDefn.pdf), which puts decades like the 1970s and 1980s firmly into the category of historical fiction.
In Chapter two--Meta-Slavery, the author focuses on the depictions of bondage within science fiction. He posits that much of the language, visual representations, and reoccurring themes lay the groundwork for discussions pertaining to slavery with science fiction.
Literary fiction works were represented by excerpts from recent National Book Award finalists or winners of the 2012 PEN/O.
Hang on a minute...You mean Non Fiction, which is all about reality, truth and knowledge, is known because it is not made up.
To consider science fiction in countries other than the United States, one must start from these shores.
There is a trend among companion readers to the science fiction genre to qualify the volume in question.
Robin Anne Reid, ed., WOMEN IN SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY.