fetch

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dad fetch my buttons

Oh my goodness! An exclamation of surprise. Dad fetch my buttons, I didn't expect such an outpouring of support from y'all!
See also: button, dad, fetch

fetch (something) out of (something)

To take something out of something. Can you please go and fetch the rest of the groceries out of my car?
See also: fetch, of, out

fetch and carry (for someone)

To perform menial tasks or errands at the behest of someone else. I thought the internship would teach me valuable skills in business, but all I did was fetch and carry for the office manager.
See also: and, carry, fetch

fetch away

1. old-fashioned To go up to someone or something with the express purpose of taking them or it away. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fetch" and "away." I had been at the party for less than an hour before my parents fetched me away in a fury. I sent my assistant to fetch away my new clothes from the tailor.
2. obsolete Of something on a sailing vessel, to come loose from restraints during a storm and slide, roll, or otherwise move leeward. The storm pitched so violently that all the furniture began fetching away.
See also: away, fetch

fetch in

To retrieve something and bring it inside. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fetch" and "in." Can you please go out to my car and fetch in the rest of the groceries?
See also: fetch

fetch out

To take something out of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fetch" and "out." Can you please go and fetch the rest of the groceries out of my car? Here, I fetched out a drink for you.
See also: fetch, out

fetch up

1. To make up the difference between oneself and someone or something, so as to be at an equal level, status, or point of progress If we speed up, we might be able to fetch up with the car ahead of us!
2. To reach a particular location, often unintentionally. We wanted to go to the beach on Saturday, but because traffic was so bad, we fetched up at the mall instead. When my car's engine overheated, I fetched up at the mechanic instead of my big job interview. Hey, how was Saturday night? Where did you fetch up at?
3. To reach the same level, progress, or quality as someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fetch" and "up." If you don't fetch up your play to the level of your teammates, you'll probably start your season on the bench.
4. To produce, make, or yield something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fetch" and "up." How on earth did the caterers fetch up 100 cupcakes with just 20 minutes' notice?
5. To stop something. Geez, can someone please fetch up that blaring alarm?
6. slang To vomit. I felt like I was going to fetch up from seasickness out on that boat.
See also: fetch, up

fetch up at (some place)

To arrive at some place or destination. So when do you guys think you'll fetch up at the hotel?
See also: fetch, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Dad fetch my buttons!

Rur. What a surprise!; Goodness me! Dad fetch my buttons! It's a letter from Aunt Rita! Dad fetch my buttons, I never was so happy in all my life!
See also: dad, fetch

fetch something in

to bring or pull something in. Would you please fetch some more firewood in? Can you fetch in the paper?
See also: fetch

fetch something out of something

 and fetch something out
to pull something out of something. Could you fetch me another hot dog out of the pot? I'll fetch out a hot dog for you.
See also: fetch, of, out

fetch up

Sl. to empty one's stomach; to vomit. I really felt like I was going to fetch up. Somebody fetched up in here and didn't clean it up.
See also: fetch, up

fetch up at

some place to reach a place; to end up at a place. We fetched up at Sam's house at about midnight. The car fetched up at the cabin and everyone got out.
See also: fetch, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fetch and carry

Do errands and other menial tasks, as in She was hired as administrative assistant, but all she does is fetch and carry for the department's supervisor . This expression originally alluded to dogs that were taught to carry various objects for their masters. It has been applied to humans since the late 1700s.
See also: and, carry, fetch
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fetch and carry

go backwards and forwards bringing things to someone in a servile fashion.
This phrase was originally used to refer to a dog retrieving game that had been shot.
See also: and, carry, fetch
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

fetch and ˈcarry (for somebody)

be always doing small jobs for somebody; act as if you were somebody’s servant: I hate having to fetch and carry for my husband all day. Why can’t he do more for himself?
See also: and, carry, fetch
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

fetch up

v.
1. To move fast enough to attain the same progress as another; catch up: They struggled to fetch up with the leader of the hike.
2. To make something equal or on a par with something else: You'd better fetch up your grades to the class average. Fetch your scores up to our median and you'll have a good chance for admission.
3. To bring something forth; to produce something: We fetched up a basketful of blueberries to make a pie. Please fetch some tomatoes up from the garden.
4. To reach a stopping place or goal; end up: I fell over my skis and fetched up in a heap on the snow.
5. To bring something to a halt; to stop something: Please fetch up the noise; I can't hear.
See also: fetch, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fetch up

in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. I really felt like I was going to fetch up.
See also: fetch, up
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, Fetcher said he fears that time for recovery is slipping away.
The caches provide a 64-bit interface to the instruction fetcher and load/store unit.
And I'm at the gate along with other fetchers 10 minutes before dismissal time.
"Leo was such a novice on the slopes that he lost control of his snowboard at the luxury Zermatt ski resort and ploughed into a tree and neck-breaking speed," (http://www.dailystar.co.uk/showbiz/373782/Leonardo-DiCaprio-almost-killed-by-internet-death-hoax) Daily Star quoted celebrity gossip website Media Fetcher.
Mark Fetcher doesn't care why New London Security Federal Credit Union failed back in 2008.
And, in a astonishingly frank and inspirational interview conducted last night at Scotland's Celtic Manor HQ, Fetcher vowed to keep fighting the good fight.
He almost wiped out that his clearing kick was ch but the Scarlets No.10 kind of athleticism tha Stephen Jones out of th made a scrambled recov The Wallabies had possession but a to use their specia Pococ catch a f most of the as they opted breakdown specialist David Pocock as a ballcatcher instead of fetcher, they failed to create momentum.
He's not like Ferguson in style, he is more a fetcher and carrier, who scurries about doing the hard yards.
O'Brien, a converted blindside, is a wrecking ball who always breaks the first tackle, while Warburton is a fetcher who dominates the breakdown.
Either way, if you take him through the following steps, your young retriever--let's call him Blackie--should become a gung-ho duck fetcher in a relatively short time.
Which cartoon did he play the voice of Fetcher the rat?
If your dog was once a fanatical fetcher, but has begun to opt-out of games--either declining to go after a thrown toy or failing to bring it back to you--there is a good chance that he's got a bad back, or some other physical ailment.
Judge David Fetcher, who has been running the courtroom temporarily in the magistrates building in Dale Street, has been trying 29 defendants a day.