References in classic literature ?
Everywhere else it had been ploughed under when the highways were surveyed; this half-mile or so within the pasture fence was all that was left of that old road which used to run like a wild thing across the open prairie, clinging to the high places and circling and doubling like a rabbit before the hounds.
A cavalry charge hurls itself against the fence; you are using no power, you are spending no money, for there is only one ground-connection till those horses come against the wire; the moment they touch it they form a con- nection with the negative brush THROUGH THE GROUND, and drop dead.
It's a belt forty feet wide, and goes around the outer fence -- distance between it and the fence one hundred yards -- kind of neutral ground that space is.
"I tell you who has no 'fences,' as you call them," she said, "and that's Mr.
I only denied--" And he swept off on the subject of fences again, and was brilliant.
Then she climbed down from the fence and walked up to it, while Toto ran around the pole and barked.
Dorothy helped him over the fence, and they started along the path of yellow brick for the Emerald City.
"That means," he said, "that there's a Woozy inside that fence, and the Woozy must be a dangerous animal or they wouldn't tell people to beware of it."
You see, Aunt Polly's awful particular about this fence -- right here on the street, you know -- but if it was the back fence I wouldn't mind and SHE wouldn't.
"Dog!" he hissed, and struck the master of fence a stinging blow across the face, and spat upon him.
He thought it annoying that in the darkness by the fence she had pretended there was nothing between them.
"Into the fence!--back into the fence!" I cried, and we sprang over the thorn-bushes where those with us were making ready their spears, trembling as they handled them with fear and the cold of the morning.
In some strange way, she knew not how, his head had become wedged at the neck between the tops of the pickets of her fence. His body hung down outside, the knees not quite touching the ground.
Particular pieces of fence or secure positions behind collections of trees were wrangled over, as gold thrones or pearl bedsteads.
"As to whether you turn your back or not, I do not concern myself," replied the master of fence; "though it might be that your grave would be dug on the spot where you planted your foot the first time; I mean that you would be stretched dead there for despising skill with the sword."