References in classic literature ?
That's right; and Sir Cecil could have that sword the Admiral threw away by the fence here.
You may remember," said the priest quietly, "that the wooden fence that might have carried it was cut away.
We weren't talking of real fences," said Lucy, laughing.
I only denied--" And he swept off on the subject of fences again, and was brilliant.
He spoke seriously to Tom across the fence on the subject of his passion.
At any rate, the fact remains that, as that fateful vegetable changed hands across the fence, something resembling a proposal of marriage did actually proceed from him.
When they got to the top of the fence they began to get down on the other side and soon were in the forest.
So, finding they could not destroy me, they drove me into this forest and built a fence around me.
During the years he had served as master of fence at the English Court the sons of royalty had learned to thrust and parry and cut as only De Vac could teach the art; and he had been as conscientious in the discharge of his duties as he had been in his unswerving hatred and contempt for his pupils.
I don't think it's such a very wonderful thing to walk a little, low, board fence," she said.
It must be wonderful, one that will be able to dance, fence, and turn somersaults.
Going into the shady outer room, he took down from the wall his veil, that hung on a peg, and putting it on, and thrusting his hands into his pockets, he went into the fenced-in bee-garden, where there stood in the midst of a closely mown space in regular rows, fastened with bast on posts, all the hives he knew so well, the old stocks, each with its own history, and along the fences the younger swarms hived that year.
In some strange way, she knew not how, his head had become wedged at the neck between the tops of the pickets of her fence.
I had but newly finished my fence, and began to enjoy my labour, when the rains came on, and made me stick close to my first habitation; for though I had made me a tent like the other, with a piece of a sail, and spread it very well, yet I had not the shelter of a hill to keep me from storms, nor a cave behind me to retreat into when the rains were extraordinary.
The fields about it were overgrown with brambles, the fences gone, even the few negro quarters, and out-houses generally, fallen partly into ruin by neglect and pillage; for the negroes and poor whites of the vicinity found in the building and fences an abundant supply of fuel, of which they availed themselves without hesitation, openly and by daylight.