femme fatale


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femme fatale

A mysterious and attractive woman who puts men in dangerous or compromising situations. James Bond is always able to see through the evil plot of the femme fatale.
See also: fatale, femme

(be) a ˌfemme faˈtale

(from French) a beautiful woman that men find sexually attractive but who brings them trouble or unhappiness: The movie follows the relationship between sexy femme fatale Suzy and young lawyer Jim, which eventually leads to a murderous crime of passion.
The meaning of the French expression is ‘disastrous woman’.
See also: fatale, femme
References in periodicals archive ?
Vik said each set of songs explores a different meditation on the concept of femme fatale.
But when one considers the term femme fatale today, it's hard not to think of film noir and characters like Phyllis, women shrouded in sinister, seductive sexuality and lit in high-contrast black-and-white.
Most of Femme Fatale Guns clientele are interested in personal defense, Bartol said.
While I don't advocate femme fatale behaviour, you have to admit that these ladies have got style.
Finally, every Femme Fatale needs a full length mirror in order to put together that 'killer' outfit.
But the femme fatale is no ordinary female character; and so a film noir in which she plays a part will be an uncharacteristic mystery, since the enigma to be solved is associated with a prior crime or crimes as well as an elusive persona.
Watch a video from the Femme Fatale Los Angeles show.
La imagen de la femme fatale tiene sus raices en el temor decimononico por las mujeres que decidian alejarse de su papel conyugal y, por esa razon, eran vituperadas y vistas como presencias amenazantes, rebeldes y usurpadoras, equiparables a la imagen de Lilith.
The femme fatale is perhaps the most iconic figure of fin de siecle decadence.
And when it comes to lotions and potions, the sweet and sexy Sultry Tangerine Tango range from Femme Fatale is high on our list of favourites.
Symbol and symptom; the femme fatale in English poetry of the 19th century and feminist criticism.
Based on how much you agree or disagree with the statements, the quiz determines just what kind of lesbian you are, for example: the Femme Fatale, the Surprise Dyke or the Stud.
Art historian Elizabeth Menon examines turn of the twentieth Century depictions of the femme fatale in various forms of popular print media (literature, illustrated journals, and advertisements) to show how they, in turn, influenced the Salon paintings of the time.
He even manages to make an American femme fatale sound like an American femme fatale, no mean feat for a British baritone.
Everything goes hourglass shaped when the story's femme fatale, Neola Durwin, enters the picture.