felt

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feel honor-bound to (do something)

To feel obliged to do something because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. Primarily heard in US. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I feel honor-bound to inform them of your actions.
See also: feel

feel like a million bucks

To feel exceptionally attractive or in very robust health. Wow, I feel like a million bucks in this new suit! I guess fluids and rest were all I needed to beat that cold. I'm already feeling like a million bucks compared to yesterday!
See also: buck, feel, like, million

feel like a million dollars

To feel exceptionally attractive or in very robust health. Wow, I feel like a million dollars in this new suit! I guess fluids and rest were all I needed to beat that cold. I'm already feeling like a million dollars compared to yesterday!
See also: dollar, feel, like, million

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

feel out of sorts

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of sorts lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of sorts in the morning.
See also: feel, of, out, sort

feel (like) (one)self

To feel as one normally does, physically or emotionally. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again after my bout with the flu. Marcy has been struggling with depression lately—I hope she feels herself again soon.
See also: feel

feel as if a cat has kittened in (one's) mouth

To feel very hungover (with an awful taste in one's mouth). A: "You don't look so good. How are you feeling after your night of partying?" B: "Ugh, I feel as if a cat has kittened in my mouth." A long night of drinking will leave you feeling as if a cat has kittened in your mouth.
See also: cat, feel, if, kitten, mouth

feel it in (one's) bones

To sense something strongly and intuitively. Please stay home tonight—this storm is going to be bad, I feel it in my bones. I know you don't agree with her decision, but she feels it in her bones that this is the best thing to do.
See also: bone, feel

feel small

To feel insignificant or see oneself negatively. After that disastrous meeting with my boss, I've never felt so small in my life. He is such a jerk and always insults her so that she feels small.
See also: feel, small

feel the draught

To be in a situation in which one does not have much money. Steve is feeling the draught right now and wants to know if we can go out next week instead, after he gets paid. If I get laid off, I know it won't be long before I feel the draught.
See also: draught, feel

feel light-headed

To feel dizzy, as if one might faint. I'm feeling light-headed because I stood up too quickly. Your mother needs to sit down because she feels light-headed all of a sudden.
See also: feel

feel all the feels

To experience a range of strong emotions. Oh man, that video for the animal shelter made me feel all the feels. I want to adopt 10 puppies now!
See also: all, feel

feel hard done-by

To feel mistreated, abused, cheated, or dejected. The company paid Steve a generous severance package after firing him, but he still feels hard done-by. I don't think you have a right to feel hard done-by since you received the same level of assessment as everyone else!
See also: feel, hard

feel hot and cold

To feel that one's body is both hot and cold at once, as from shock or illness. After the pneumonia took hold, she felt hot and cold all night.
See also: and, cold, feel, hot

I've never (done something) in all my (born) days

I have never (felt, hear, seen, experienced, etc.) something like this before in my entire life. After the election, I've never felt more proud in all my born days! I've never experienced a lightning storm as intense as this in all my days.
See also: all, days, never

make (one's) presence felt

To create a strong impression or effect on among a group of people or in a particular situation. As the youngest CEO in the company's history, Mark felt he had to make his presence felt by introducing a couple major policy changes. The small but vocal group has already made their presence felt in the most recent presidential election.
See also: felt, make, presence

feel (one's) way

To proceed with some task slowly and carefully, typically by using intuition or trial and error, as opposed to previous experience or expert knowledge. The intended image is of one tentatively navigating through a dark space by touch instead of sight. I'm new to the process, so I'm still feeling my way through it, but I think I'm starting to get the hang of it. If you don't know the answer to a question, try to feel your way through it by using the context clues.
See also: feel, way

feel like

1. To have the urge or desire to do something. Where do you feel like going to dinner?
2. To feel the urge or desire to have something. I just feel like a burger and fries, nothing fancy.
3. To feel as one usually does. In this usage, "like" is followed by a reflexive pronoun. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again, after battling that cold for weeks.
See also: feel, like

feel out

1. To carefully and cautiously try to gain knowledge of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "feel" and "out." I'm hesitant to say anything too controversial since I'm still feeling out the environment at my new job.
2. To indirectly try to learn someone's viewpoint or opinion. A noun or pronoun can be used between "feel" and "out." A: "You haven't asked your mom if you can go to the party yet?" B: "I'm still feeling her out. If I ask her directly, she'll definitely say no!"
3. To use one's hands and feet to carefully move through a dark space. A noun or pronoun can be used between "feel" and "out." I knocked over the lamp while trying to feel my way out of the room.
See also: feel, out

feel up to (doing something)

To have enough energy or preparation to be able to do something. While I was sick, I didn't feel up to doing much besides napping and watching TV.
See also: feel, up

feel like someone or something

to have the feel of someone or something; to seem to be someone or something according to feel or touch. Whoever this is feels like Tom. Sort of soft and pudgy. This thing feels like a rubber hose, not a hot dog.
See also: feel, like

feel someone out (about someone or something)

Fig. to find out what someone thinks about someone or something. (This does not involve touching anyone.) I will feel him out about what he thinks about going to Florida. Let me feel out the boss about this matter.
See also: feel, out

I felt like a penny waiting for change.

Rur. I felt worthless or helpless. When I lost the race, I felt like a penny waiting for change. My best girl went off with someone else. I felt like a penny waiting for change.
See also: change, felt, like, penny, waiting

(I've) never been better.

 and (I've) never felt better.
a response to a greeting inquiry into one's health or state of being. Mary: How are you, Sally? Sally: Never been better, Mary. How about you? Doctor: How are you, Jane? Jane: Never felt better. Doctor: Then why are you here?
See also: been, better, never

feel like

Have an inclination or desire for, as in I feel like going out tonight, or Do you feel like steak for dinner? [Colloquial; early 1800s]
See also: feel, like

feel out

Try cautiously or indirectly to ascertain someone's viewpoint or the nature of something. For example, We'd better feel out the author before we commit him to a publicity tour. This term alludes to physical groping. [Late 1800s] Also see take the pulse of.
See also: feel, out

make your presence felt

If someone or something makes their presence felt, they do something that makes you notice them or pay attention to them. I was here, there and everywhere all day, making my presence felt. First of all, establish what areas of your body are making their presence felt.
See also: felt, make, presence

feel the draught

experience an adverse change in your financial circumstances. informal
1992 Daily Express Redland…felt the draught of George Wimpey's interim profits slide.
See also: draught, feel

make your presence felt

have a strong and obvious effect on others or on a situation.
2004 Casino City Times Women are really now making their presence felt on the Internet.
See also: felt, make, presence

feel the ˈdraught

(informal) suffer financially as a result of economic, social or political changes around you: Because of the world trade recession, a lot of third world countries are feeling the draught.
See also: draught, feel

make your ˈpresence felt

do something which makes people notice your importance, strength, abilities, etc: In the first half of the game the Turkish team really made their presence felt.The demonstrators made their presence felt by shouting and waving banners.
See also: felt, make, presence

feel like

v.
1. To desire to do something: We all got bored and felt like leaving. I feel like ordering a cup of coffee.
2. To desire to have something: I feel like a cup of coffee.
See also: feel, like

feel out

v.
1. To examine or investigate the opinion or nature of someone or something: We need to feel out the landlord about lowering the rent. My friends felt me out to see if I wanted to go to the carnival with them.
2. To find a path, especially through physical exploration of one's surroundings: We felt our way out of the dark room. They felt out a path to the edge of the underbrush.
See also: feel, out

feel like

Informal
To have an inclination or desire for: felt like going for a walk.
See also: feel, like

feel like (oneself)

To sense oneself as being in one's normal state of health or spirits: I just don't feel like myself today.
See also: feel, like