fall into oblivion

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fall into oblivion

1. To become lost to obscurity; to not be known or remembered by anyone. The poet fell into oblivion after the war, only coming back into public awareness after an archive of his works was discovered in the basement of an abandoned warehouse in East Germany. He held a rather cynical view of parenthood, believing that people only had children to avoid falling into oblivion.
2. To enter into total unconsciousness. The last thing I remember was the doctor asking me to count to ten before the general anesthetic took effect and I fell into oblivion. He was so utterly exhausted that he fell into oblivion the moment my head hit the pillow.
See also: fall, oblivion
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They fell into oblivion but they were better players than me and should have gone on to have careers in the game.
The band fell into oblivion but Nick enjoyed a successful solo career with hits including Whistle Down The Wind, Take That Situation and Blue Hat For a Blue Day.
However, it gradually fell into oblivion.The team of young people, composed of ethnologist Katariacutena Chabre#269ekovaacute, art painter Sarah I.
231), one might wonder why such an original thinker fell into oblivion for centuries immediately after his lifetime.
Unfortunately, those who think it a merit to denigrate other people's sacred values have recently so multiplied that Rushdie and Nasrin long fell into oblivion.
Most towns boom and bust, but linger on for better or worse over several generations.  What makes towns like Waiuta so fascinating is that it rose, prospered, and fell into oblivion all in a single man's lifetime.  Perhaps, what makes it even more intriguing, is that it was such a "good" town.  It was a happy town with a library, bars, restaurants, even a hotel.  It had amenities that stretched beyond its company ties.
Marie had seven editions until 1842 after which it fell into oblivion, in spite of Beaumont's prominent political and intellectual position (he was a member of the Chamber of Deputies and author of another important book on Ireland).
Brosch had had difficulties showing his anti-official oeuvre in East Germany, and left for West Germany in 1979; after a brief moment in the limelight there, he fell into oblivion. While I don't find Brosch's paintings intriguing, I do think that the exhibition raised important issues concerning the way mainstream art history is written and how it can be challenged by a private society or "circle of friends."
breathed new life into the French mysticism that fell into oblivion following the Quietism controversy and Fenelon's condemnation (1699).
Although the work enjoyed a modest success at its 1864 premiere in Vienna, it quickly fell into oblivion. It was left largely to musicologist Jean-Christophe Keck (supervising editor of the new Offenbach Critical Edition) to locate and edit the various original sources that were, as he has said, "scattered all over the world." The somewhat unwieldy libretto set in 16th-century Germany is a far cry from the frothy French fare for which the German-born boulevardier is most famous (such as La Vie Parisienne and La Belle Helene), but musically there is much to admire in this wonderfully orchestrated score.
However, because so few copies existed, the book fell into oblivion, hardly figuring in Neruda bibliographies.
Kuefler explains how and why certain saints like St Martin of Tours gained notoriety and eternal vibrancy, while others like Gerald gradually fell into oblivion. The notion that saints' lives were and are fluid and living objects represents a crucial concept in these final chapters.