feel (like) (oneself)

(redirected from feels herself)

feel (like) (oneself)

To feel as one normally does, physically or emotionally. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again after my bout with the flu. Marcy has been struggling with depression lately—I hope she feels herself again soon.
See also: feel
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The one place she feels herself is when she is reading, hunkered down with a good book.
The one place she feels herself is when she is readinRg, hunkered down with a good book.
However, in running she has found solace and therapy, admitting in her first book Jog On, that she no longer feels herself when a day passes and she has not pulled on her trainers.
"She feels herself deteriorating and she is worried sick what will happen.
The actress feels herself suitable for all type of roles thanks to her army background.
Performing reinvigorates her faith in people--and, maybe, in her ability to reach them, to transcend the villain she sometimes feels herself to be.
The four teens react in unique and surreal ways: China swallows herself whole; Lansdale's compulsive lies make her hair grow feet every day; Gustav builds an invisible helicopter; and Stanzi feels herself split in two.
But she feels herself ill at ease when she is obliged to stay in step with the crawling hours of night at a cot placed over another cot defeating the notionof secludedprivacy that goes with celebrities of fashion and ramp walk as inevitableingredient of their day to day life.
Rather, she feels herself to be an ordinary person with a greater capacity to love (and that includes an intrinsic belief in and love of God.)
However, when she meets kind-hearted widowed store owner Alex (Josh Duhamel) who is struggling to raise his two children, Katie feels herself falling for him, and she realizes she must choose between familiar safety and the perils that come with love.
She feels herself not getting quite the elan that she needs, her bare right foot touches the rock on the other side, but just its edge.
Although he was chased away, she feels herself in danger and worries for her child's safety.
While Sarah, who's compassionate, friendly, and forthright, feels herself pulled in different directions, veering from a punk-goth melange to a goodie-two-shoes aesthetic depending on whether she's with her father or mother, her journey is not a contemporary retelling of Lisa, Bright and Dark, the late 1990s hit that chronicles a girl's descent into madness.
Ever since the death of her father from cancer months earlier, she feels herself being pulled deeper underwater.
Molly feels herself growing angry and indignant for the millions of men who suffer injustice at the hands of the law for "the good of the children."