feel duty bound to (do something)

(redirected from feels duty bound to)

feel duty bound to (do something)

To feel obliged to do something because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. Primarily heard in US. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I feel duty bound to inform them of your actions.
See also: bound, duty, feel

be/feel duty/honour ˈbound to do something

(British English) (American English be/feel duty/honor ˈbound to do something) (formal) feel that you must do something because of your sense of moral duty: She felt honour bound to attend as she had promised to.Most people think that children are duty bound to look after their parents when they are old.
References in periodicals archive ?
When she comes across a sick young man lying in the road, she is shocked and frightened but feels duty bound to help him.
Audrey feels duty bound to inform Fiz of the bad news: that Maria is under the impression that she and Tyrone, pictured, are already an item.
The government feels duty bound to honour this fundamental right.
Maria's away and Roy, who finds Tony collapsed in the street and gives him first aid, feels duty bound to stay with him in hospital.
"He signed a contract some time ago and feels duty bound to honour it.
"Nevertheless, the board of Bohemian FC feels duty bound to protect our home ground and to maintain our good relations with the local business and residential community.
When he later finds Bob in the tender hands of Princess Shalamar (Dorothy Lamour), he feels duty bound to rescue his old friend - or even swap places.
EASTENDERS: Ruth tries to slip out of Albert Square unnoticed to visit Gita, but Mark feels duty bound to tell Sanjay that his wife and daughter are alive and well.
The thing about mascots is that every nation will feel duty bound to have one, just as every nation feels duty bound to enter the Eurovision Song Contest, even though Norway would have done better most years by sticking a harpoon up a polar bear's backside and taping the result.