feel (like) (one)self

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feel (like) (one)self

To feel as one normally does, physically or emotionally. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again after my bout with the flu. Marcy has been struggling with depression lately—I hope she feels herself again soon.
See also: feel
References in classic literature ?
Tulliver was mute, feeling herself a truly wretched mother.
Feeling herself in antagonism she was quite in accord.
It's clear Stacey isn't feeling herself as when she realises Carmel doesn't trust her around Arthur, instead of shouting the odds, she ends up breaking down.
Bright colors, creative scenes, exciting graphics and Clarkson feeling herself and getting into the song 6 those are what awaits the viewer of this music video.
Feeling herself a complete outsider Becky knows she is not one bit pretty or interesting.
If she's feeling herself, she's feeling herself and no one can stop her.
Morcho knows the feeling herself, having spent her childhood in Cameroon, Central Africa.
Gwyneth hasn't been feeling herself recently and she decides to revisit the doctor to put her mind at rest.
An X Factor spokeswoman said: "Janet's grandad passed away so she isn't just feeling herself but she's had a chat with her family and they have decided she has to perform.
Normally she would be barking orders and bossing people around but she's not feeling herself.
BETTY Suarez is not feeling herself tonight, and some dodgy perfume is to blame.
The first of the three stories concludes with the former slave Phillis Wheatley's bemusement at the fact that George Washington ends his letter to her by calling himself her "servant," while the third story cleverly has Martha Washington ponder the ironies of feeling herself "enslaved" to the black people she owns as she tries to make herself "free of the errors of George Washington.
Gloria panicked just a little and, feeling herself become warm, told Jesse that this is all a "matter of faith," not science.
She was very sorry not to be able to be here but she needs to watch the race and get the feeling herself.
Thus began a twenty-year ordeal in which Teresa suffered not only grave physical illnesses and the emotional loss of her father but also the spiritual agony of feeling herself hypocritical.