feel someone's pain, to

(redirected from feel your pain)

feel someone's pain, to

To empathize completely with someone. This hyperbolic idea is often asserted hypocritically, or by someone who is actually causing the pain. Thus, “I feel your pain” can be a politician’s response to a constituent who is complaining about the minimum wage, even though he actually voted against its being increased. This expression needs to be differentiated from feeling no pain, a slangy phrase from the mid-twentieth century describing someone who is intoxicated, and from I feel for you but I can’t quite reach you, a slangy response expressing lack of sympathy for someone’s hard-luck story.
See also: feel
References in periodicals archive ?
LORDE has spoken out about her struggle with acne, telling fans who suffer from spots: "I feel your pain."
I FEEL your pain, states Prime Minister Gordon Brown to millions who will be affected by higher taxation, price increases etc.
Well, we feel your pain. It's not that we forgot that this issue marks CURVE'S 17th anniversary, it's just that, like a lot of you, we were so busy with life (like, uh, putting together a magazine) that we didn't have time to celebrate.
Fellow donkeys, I feel your pain. Like you, I could taste that victory right up until the terribly disappointing deal went down.
Geldof and others at the frontline of this campaign have told Africa: 'We feel your pain.'
Women all over the world feel your pain Gail, we really do.
DVD producers feel your pain, giving you a second chance to indulge in the very gay Boy Meats Boy,.
Bill Clinton used enough variations of "I feel your pain" that it became fodder for the late-night TV comics.
He rose to the highest office in the land not on any recognizable policy platform or coherent philosophy of government but on the emotive yelp, "I feel your pain." He billed himself as "The Comeback Kid," the triumphant son of a broken home.
She loves and wants you to know she can feel your pain and understands what you have come through.
To blacks, Clinton once again said, "I feel your pain." To whites, he said, "I am bad enough to walk streets--albeit with Secret Service in tow--that most of you wouldn't be caught on at high noon." If the black community needed more reason to continue its love affair with Clinton, this was it.