a feather in (one's) cap

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a feather in (one's) cap

An accomplishment or achievement that one takes pride in. If this clinical trial is successful, it will be a real feather in her cap. I can't wait until I'm named valedictorian— it's such a feather in my cap! Earning that full scholarship to Yale is quite a feather in his cap.
See also: cap, feather

feather in (one's) cap

A big achievement or accomplishment. Earning that full scholarship to Yale is quite a feather in his cap. Getting promoted to management after spending only a month at the new job was a feather in her cap.
See also: cap, feather
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

feather in one's cap

Fig. an honor; a reward for something. Getting a new client was really a feather in my cap. John earned a feather in his cap by getting an A in physics.
See also: cap, feather
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

feather in one's cap, a

An act or deed to one's credit; a distinctive achievement. For example, Getting all three factions to the bargaining table would be a feather in his cap. This expression alludes to the practice of putting a feather on a soldier's cap for every enemy he kills, an early practice of some Native American tribes and many other peoples. [Early 1600s]
See also: feather
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a feather in someone's cap

If you describe an achievement as a feather in someone's cap, you mean that they have done very well and people will admire them. It was a definite feather in his cap to have attended such a famous university. Hauptmann's arrest is a feather in the cap of the New Jersey police. Note: Traditionally, Native American warriors added feathers to their headdresses as a sign of bravery in battle. Medieval knights in England also wore feathers in their helmets as a sign of their bravery.
See also: cap, feather
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a feather in your cap

an achievement to be proud of.
Originally (in the late 17th century), a feather in your cap was taken as a sign of foolishness. However, by the mid 18th century the phrase was acquiring its modern positive sense.
1998 Times To take six wickets in the last innings of the game was a feather in his cap.
See also: cap, feather
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a ˈfeather in your cap

an achievement, a success or an honour which you can be proud of: It’s a real feather in his cap to represent his country in the Olympics. OPPOSITE: a black mark (against somebody)This idiom comes from the Native American custom of giving a feather to somebody who had been very brave in battle.
See also: cap, feather
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

feather in (one's) cap

An act or deed to one's credit; a distinctive achievement.
See also: cap, feather
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

feather in one's cap, a

A special honor or achievement. This term comes from the custom of numerous peoples—American Indian tribes, Turks, Himalayan peoples, among others—of placing a feather in a soldier’s cap for every enemy he kills. The term began to be used figuratively by the early seventeenth century and was a cliché by the time Laurence Sterne wrote, “The feather put into his cap of having been abroad” (Tristram Shandy, 1761–67).
See also: feather
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

a feather in your cap

An honor. If you were praised or awarded a commendation, you had a feather in your cap. The phrase was most likely inspired by the idea that heroic Native American warriors were given additional plumage for their war bonnets.
See also: cap, feather
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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