fault

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Related to faulting: earthquake, normal fault

at fault

Responsible for a problem, mistake, or other incident. The other driver was definitely at fault—I was just sitting at a red light when he rear-ended me! I know I was at fault, so I will apologize to Sara today.
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to a fault

To an extreme to excessive degree; more than is usual or necessary. Jim is polite to a fault—it can actually be a little bit irritating sometimes. The police sergeant is honest to a fault, following every regulation and guideline without question.
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find fault with (someone or something)

To find a problem or issue with someone or something; to judge someone or something harshly. Kristen will be single forever if she keeps finding fault with every man she dates. How could you find fault with this project? It met all of the requirements on the rubric.
See also: fault, find

generous to a fault

Prone to generosity, perhaps excessively so. Of course you gave Sean money again—you're generous to a fault.
See also: fault, generous

at fault

to blame [for something]; serving as the cause of something bad. I was not at fault in the accident. You cannot blame me.
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fault someone (for something)

to blame or criticize someone for something. I can't fault you for that. I would have done the same thing. He tended to fault himself for the failure of the project.

find fault (with someone or something)

to find things wrong with someone or something. We were unable to find fault with his arguments. Sally's father was always finding fault with her.
See also: fault, find

generous to a fault

Cliché too generous; overly generous. My favorite uncle is generous to a fault. Sallyalways generous to a fault—gave away her lunch to a homeless man.
See also: fault, generous

at fault

Responsible for a mistake, trouble, or failure; deserving blame. For example, At least three cars were involved in the accident, so it was hard to determine which driver was at fault , or He kept missing the target and wondered if the sight on his new rifle was at fault. In Britain this usage was formerly considered incorrect but is now acceptable; in America it has been widespread since the mid-1800s. Also see in the wrong.
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find fault

Criticize, express dissatisfaction with, as in She was a difficult traveling companion, constantly finding fault with the hotel, meal service, and tour guides . [Mid-1500s]
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to a fault

Excessively, extremely, as in He was generous to a fault. This phrase, always qualifying an adjective, has been so used since the mid-1700s. Indeed, Oliver Goldsmith had this precise usage in The Life of Richard Nash (1762).
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to a fault

COMMON If someone has a good quality to a fault, they have more of this quality than is usual or necessary. She was generous to a fault and tried to see that we had everything we needed. He's honest to a fault, brave, dedicated, and fiercely proud of the New York Police Department.
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— to a fault

(of someone or something displaying a particular commendable quality) to an extent verging on excess.
1995 Bill Bryson Notes from a Small Island Anyway, that's the kind of place Bournemouth is—genteel to a fault and proud of it.
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at ˈfault

responsible for doing wrong, making a mistake, etc.; to be blamed: The inquiry will decide who was at fault over the loss of the funds.I don’t feel that I am at fault. After all, I didn’t know I was breaking a rule.
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to a ˈfault

(written) used to say that somebody has a lot, or even too much of a particular good quality: He was generous to a fault.
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find ˈfault (with somebody/something)

look for faults or mistakes in somebody/something, often so that you can criticize them/it: He’s always finding fault with the children, even when they are doing nothing wrong.I can find no fault with this essay; it’s the best I’ve ever read. OPPOSITE: sing somebody’s/something’s praises
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at fault

1. Deserving of blame; guilty: admitted to being at fault.
2. Confused and puzzled.
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find fault

To seek, find, and complain about faults; criticize: found fault with his speech.
See also: fault, find

to a fault

To an excessive degree: generous to a fault.
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to a fault

Excessively so. This locution, which is always applied to a quality that is inherently good but may not be so in excess—for example, “generous to a fault”—dates from the nineteenth century. The fault in question, of course, is that of excess. Robert Browning used it in The Ring and the Book (1868), “Faultless to a fault”—that is, too perfect. A similar phrase is to a fare-the-well, but it implies perfection and not necessarily excess. For example, “The table was decorated to a fare-the-well; nothing was lacking.” See also too much of a good thing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The three faulting models proposed at propagating rifts involve items found in nearly every household: decks of cards and a bookshelf.
Coupled with enhanced sonar imaging from the late 1970s and early 1980s that gave sharper pictures of a wide range of propagating rifts, they were able to associate bookshelf faulting with such faults.
Being extensional regime there is normal faulting which at depth, as observed in this work, converts into listric faults striking towards northwest-southwest.
The presence of smaller, second-order faults indicates a spatial changeability of stress fields and therefore a complexity of faulting in the area of the USCB.
Traditionally, it was believed to be nearly free of any major faulting (Hibsch, 1926).
The cross-cutting relationship, and geometric and magnitude incoherence implies a temporal evolution of slip from dip- to strike-slip during the mainshock faulting. The interpretation is consistent with the thrust fault plane solution with minor right-lateral strike-slip component.