fault


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at fault

Responsible for a problem, mistake, or other incident. The other driver was definitely at fault—I was just sitting at a red light when he rear-ended me! I know I was at fault, so I will apologize to Sara today.
See also: fault

everyone can find fault, few can do better

proverb It is much easier to criticize than it is to actually implement improvements. Of course Sue thinks we could have done a better job with the book sale, but I didn't hear her offering any suggestions while we were planning it. Everyone can find fault, few can do better. Everyone can find fault, few can do better—that's why their changes didn't actually generate more sales.
See also: better, can, everyone, few, find

find fault with (someone or something)

To find a problem or issue with someone or something; to judge someone or something harshly. Kristen will be single forever if she keeps finding fault with every man she dates. How could you find fault with this project? It met all of the requirements on the rubric.
See also: fault, find

generous to a fault

Prone to generosity, perhaps excessively so. Of course you gave Sean money again—you're generous to a fault.
See also: fault, generous, to

honest to a fault

Honest to an extreme or excessive degree; more honest than is usual or necessary. Jim wouldn't even tell a white lie—he's honest to a fault. It can actually be a little bit irritating sometimes. The police sergeant is honest to a fault, following every regulation and guideline without question.
See also: fault, honest, to

love sees no faults

People are unable or unwilling to see the flaws in those with whom they are in love. Everyone kept telling me that she had too many issues to be in a stable relationship, but I couldn't bring myself to listen until things started getting bad between us. Love sees no faults, I guess.
See also: fault, love, no, see

to a fault

To an extreme to excessive degree; more than is usual or necessary. Jim is polite to a fault—it can actually be a little bit irritating sometimes. The police sergeant is honest to a fault, following every regulation and guideline without question.
See also: fault, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

at fault

to blame [for something]; serving as the cause of something bad. I was not at fault in the accident. You cannot blame me.
See also: fault

fault someone (for something)

to blame or criticize someone for something. I can't fault you for that. I would have done the same thing. He tended to fault himself for the failure of the project.

find fault (with someone or something)

to find things wrong with someone or something. We were unable to find fault with his arguments. Sally's father was always finding fault with her.
See also: fault, find

generous to a fault

Cliché too generous; overly generous. My favorite uncle is generous to a fault. Sallyalways generous to a fault—gave away her lunch to a homeless man.
See also: fault, generous, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

at fault

Responsible for a mistake, trouble, or failure; deserving blame. For example, At least three cars were involved in the accident, so it was hard to determine which driver was at fault , or He kept missing the target and wondered if the sight on his new rifle was at fault. In Britain this usage was formerly considered incorrect but is now acceptable; in America it has been widespread since the mid-1800s. Also see in the wrong.
See also: fault

find fault

Criticize, express dissatisfaction with, as in She was a difficult traveling companion, constantly finding fault with the hotel, meal service, and tour guides . [Mid-1500s]
See also: fault, find

to a fault

Excessively, extremely, as in He was generous to a fault. This phrase, always qualifying an adjective, has been so used since the mid-1700s. Indeed, Oliver Goldsmith had this precise usage in The Life of Richard Nash (1762).
See also: fault, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

to a fault

COMMON If someone has a good quality to a fault, they have more of this quality than is usual or necessary. She was generous to a fault and tried to see that we had everything we needed. He's honest to a fault, brave, dedicated, and fiercely proud of the New York Police Department.
See also: fault, to
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

— to a fault

(of someone or something displaying a particular commendable quality) to an extent verging on excess.
1995 Bill Bryson Notes from a Small Island Anyway, that's the kind of place Bournemouth is—genteel to a fault and proud of it.
See also: fault, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at ˈfault

responsible for doing wrong, making a mistake, etc.; to be blamed: The inquiry will decide who was at fault over the loss of the funds.I don’t feel that I am at fault. After all, I didn’t know I was breaking a rule.
See also: fault

to a ˈfault

(written) used to say that somebody has a lot, or even too much of a particular good quality: He was generous to a fault.
See also: fault, to

find ˈfault (with somebody/something)

look for faults or mistakes in somebody/something, often so that you can criticize them/it: He’s always finding fault with the children, even when they are doing nothing wrong.I can find no fault with this essay; it’s the best I’ve ever read. OPPOSITE: sing somebody’s/something’s praises
See also: fault, find
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at fault

1. Deserving of blame; guilty: admitted to being at fault.
2. Confused and puzzled.
See also: fault

find fault

To seek, find, and complain about faults; criticize: found fault with his speech.
See also: fault, find

to a fault

To an excessive degree: generous to a fault.
See also: fault, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

to a fault

Excessively so. This locution, which is always applied to a quality that is inherently good but may not be so in excess—for example, “generous to a fault”—dates from the nineteenth century. The fault in question, of course, is that of excess. Robert Browning used it in The Ring and the Book (1868), “Faultless to a fault”—that is, too perfect. A similar phrase is to a fare-the-well, but it implies perfection and not necessarily excess. For example, “The table was decorated to a fare-the-well; nothing was lacking.” See also too much of a good thing.
See also: fault, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ortega, "Fault detection by means of Hilbert-Huang transform of the stator current in a PMSM with demagnetization," IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, vol.25, no.2, pp.312-318, June 2010, doi: 10.1109/TEC.2009.2037922.
Ding, "Detection and discrimination of open-phase fault in permanent magnet synchronous motor drive system," IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol.31, no.7, pp.4697-4709, July 2016, doi: 10.1109/TPEL.2015.
* The fault detection agent is responsible for extracting more information about the building systems than is directly measurable from sensors.
* The fault diagnostic agent collects fault symptoms then processes them through fault diagnostic algorithms.
If the FPGA size is considered as S, and the application circuit is divided into N submodules each with area [A.sub.module], and a fault detection technique for each module with area [A.sub.detection], then the total area of the application is given by equation 1.
When distinguishing between transient and permanent faults, the number of tolerated faults can be increased, where transient fault does not require relocation and can be recovered by reconfiguration.
In Metro Manila, the agency maintains 20 continuous GPS to monitor the West Valley Fault, which Phivolcs warned is ripe for movement.
To make the active fault maps easily accessible to everyone, Phivolcs created the web-based application, FaultFinder.
The Fangzheng fault depression has mainly controlled by tectonic activities such as strike-slip and compression of the Tan-Lu fault zone and the thermal uplift caused by deep geological processes.
Fangzheng fault depression from south to north seismic profile shows different fault depression structures (Fig.
A new list of second-hand vehicles also shows their most common faults and when they become a problem for drivers across the UK.
The findings are based on a number of key indicators, including the numbers of claims against faults and how much each car costs, reportThe Sun.
(3) The ability of sensor nodes to collect data is not fully utilized, and only the spatial correlation of the sensor network is used to achieve fault detection so that the complexity of algorithms increases significantly