fat-cat

(redirected from fat-cats)

fat cat

A disparaging term for a rich and powerful person. The voters were tired of all the fat cats running for political office. They wanted someone who understood the plight of the middle class.
See also: cat, fat

fat-cat

1. noun Someone who is very wealthy and successful. That guy is a really fat-cat in Hollywood, so we definitely have to impress him if we want to get our movie made.
2. adjective Describing such a person or the condition of being wealthy and successful. That's a fat-cat kind of house—something we middle-class people can only dream about.

fat cat

Fig. someone who is ostentatiously and smugly wealthy. I like to watch the fat cats go by in their BMWs. I'm no fat cat. I can't even pay my normal bills!
See also: cat, fat

fat cat

A wealthy and privileged person, as in This neighborhood, with its million-dollar estates, is full of fat cats. This term originally meant "a rich contributor to a political campaign," and while this usage persists, it now is often applied more broadly, as in the example. [Colloquial; 1920s]
See also: cat, fat

a fat cat

COMMON You call a businessperson or politician a fat cat when you disapprove of the way they use their wealth and power because it seems unfair or wrong to you. These fat cats of commerce make huge profits out of the public. Yet again privatisation benefits City fat cats at the expense of the customer. Note: You can also use fat cat before a noun. The taxpayer will be left to pay while the fat cat businessmen get the cream of Britain's rail services. He promised to end fat-cat salaries for union bosses and increase worker wages.
See also: cat, fat

a ˈfat cat

(informal, disapproving) a person who earns, or has, a lot of money (especially when compared to people who do not earn much): The company director is described as a fat cat, who enjoys his luxury lifestyle but doesn’t care about his employees.
See also: cat, fat

fat-cat

1. n. someone with great wealth and the accompanying success. I like to watch the fat-cats go by in their beemers.
2. mod. having to do with wealth or a wealthy person. You’ll never see me driving any of those fat-cat cars.

fat cat

A wealthy individual. This rhyming term, originating in America about 1920, once had a more specific meaning, that is, a rich individual who made large contributions to a political party or campaign. Later it was extended to any wealthy person, as well as an individual who has become lazy or smug as the result of material assets. Thus, an article in the Saturday Review of Literature in 1949, “Hollywood celebrities, literary fat cats.” In a still more generalized sense, the New York Times headlined a column about the financial situation and the administration’s reaction to it “In the New Populism Add the Government to the List of ‘Fat Cats’” (June 17, 2010). See also deep pockets.
See also: cat, fat
References in periodicals archive ?
As far as the people in higher management (the Suits, Fat-Cats, BeanCounters, etc.) can see, all operations are being done.
Ordinary workers, who earned a fraction of what fat-cats like Drumm paid themselves, are now the ones left carrying the can for this disgusting legacy of excess and greed.
Nobody, and certainly not fat-cat bosses like Sean FitzPatrick and David Drumm, were going to shout stop.
City fat-cats are making the most of generous redundancy payments by setting off on the pin-striped version of student gap years, according to a new study.
I WAS furious when I read your article about greedy fat-cats at Scottish Gas fining customers a fiver when they are sent a reminder letter.
Whatever PAM's dubious strategic value, the image of a group of cigar-chomping fat-cats wagering on next week's bloodiest headlines should have made PAM a self-evident nonstarter.
It's just the latest self-satisfied report from the fat-cats' club, who are ripping us off on the forecourts.
But motorists can drive past the fat-cats' filling stations and find the pumps with cheaper prices.
Board fat-cats will also be reviewed every three years to see if a clear-out of top brass is needed.
Yesterday Ofgas and British Gas refused to comment but one City analyst said: "The fat-cats will be scared stiff by any cuts.
Fat-cat gas bosses will today be ordered to slash domestic bills by up to pounds 30 a year.
But it seems fat-cats earning more than EUR250,000 continue to enjoy a massive windfall from the Government.
These outrageous tax reliefs, which only benefit fat-cats, must immediately be scrapped to ensure everyone pays their fair share.
Labour blasted rail privatisation last night as it revealed that ten fat-cats have creamed off pounds 103 million.
Here's your chance to steal a march on big city fat-cats and make your fortune on the Stock Exchange.