fat is in the fire, the

the fat is in the fire

Problems are about to begin. Just so you know, Mom found out you lied to her. The fat is in the fire now, huh?
See also: fat, fire
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fat is in the fire

Prov. Matters have come to a crisis; trouble is about to start. Brother: Mom found out that we broke the clock. Sister: Uh-oh. The fat's in the fire now. The fat is in the fire at work; we're nowhere near finishing the project, but the deadline is in two days.
See also: fat, fire
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fat is in the fire, the

A course of action with inevitable bad consequences has begun; there's trouble ahead. For example, Now the fat's in the fire-the boss arrived early and will see we haven't even started work . This expression, with its allusion to fat dropping into a fire and causing a burst of flames, was already a proverb in John Heywood's 1546 collection.
See also: fat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the fat is in the fire

If the fat is in the fire, someone has said or done something which is going to upset other people and cause a lot of trouble. It was too late. The media had reported the minister's statement and the fat was in the fire. Note: You can say that someone pulls the fat out of the fire when they prevent or stop trouble by taking action at a very late stage. The chairman has resigned but whether the remaining management can pull the fat out of the fire remains to be seen. Note: When food is being cooked over a fire, if fat or oil falls into the fire, the flames suddenly burn very fiercely.
See also: fat, fire
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

the fat is in the fire

something has been said or done that is about to cause trouble or anger.
This expression refers to the sizzling and spitting caused by a spillage of cooking fat into an open flame. It was first used, in the mid 16th century, to indicate the complete failure of a plan or enterprise.
See also: fat, fire
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the fat is in the ˈfire

(informal) something has been said or done that is certain to cause anger, fighting, offended feelings or other trouble: The fat’s in the fire now. Jim has just told his wife that he has taken a job in another town without mentioning it to her first.
See also: fat, fire
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the fat is in the fire

Bad consequences are sure to follow; trouble lies ahead.
See also: fat, fire
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fat is in the fire, the

It’s too late for a rescue; a crisis is imminent. This expression already appeared in John Heywood’s proverb collection of 1546 in its present form and has continued to be used with great regularity to the present day. A long-lived cliché that is by no means obsolete, it refers, of course, to the way a fire flares up when grease is spilled into it, an idea soon transferred to the more general sense that damage has been done.
See also: fat
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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