fare

(redirected from fared)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

to a fare-thee-well

1. To a state or condition of utmost perfection or completion. Her new house is absolutely gorgeous! They've designed it to a fare-thee-well.
2. To the greatest or furthest degree possible. After the economy crashed, the government began whittling down social welfare to a fare-thee-well. The home team trounced their opponents, beating them to a fare-thee-well.

fare thee well

The highest degree; perfection. Wow, you really played that part to a fare thee well—I'm so impressed!
See also: fare, thee, well

standard fare

A common occurrence. Smashed instruments are standard fare at a rock concert. Arguments are standard fare for the Smith family at Thanksgiving, believe me.
See also: fare, standard

Lenten fare

1. Literally, food that does not contain meat and may therefore be served during the Christian observance of Lent. Mom is serving our usual Lenten fare of battered cod and boiled potatoes again tonight.
2. By extension, meager meals or rations, especially those that contain no meat. The stranded sailor survived for nearly three months on a Lenten fare of wild vegetables and fish caught with a rudimentary net.
See also: fare

fare against (someone or something)

To perform or work well in comparison to someone or something else. I wonder how they will fare against the top-seeded team in the division.
See also: fare

fare up

To perform or work well in comparison to someone or something else. I wonder if they will fare up to the top-seeded team in the division.
See also: fare, up

to a fare-thee-well

To the most extreme degree, especially a condition of perfection. For example, We've cleaned the house to a fare-thee-well, or He played the part of martyr to a fare-thee-well. This term first appeared as to a fare-you-well in the late 1800s, and the more archaic-sounding present form replaced it about 1940.

to a fare-thee-well

to perfection; thoroughly. US
This expression is of late 18th-century American origin, and is also found in the form to a fare-you-well .
1911 R. D. Saunders Colonel Todhunter The fight's begun, and we've got to rally around old Bill Strickland to a fare-you-well.

Lenten fare

meagre rations that do not include meat.
Lenten fare is literally food appropriate to Lent , the Christian season of fasting between Ash Wednesday and Easter Saturday in commemoration of Jesus's forty days of fasting in the wilderness.
See also: fare

fare against

v.
To perform or function at a level comparable with that of something or someone else: I wonder how well the new car models fare against the old ones.
See also: fare

fare up

v.
To perform or function successfully at a level comparable with or equal to that of something or someone else; fare against: They worked hard to win the competition, but in the end they didn't fare up. My performance didn't fare up to that of the other players.
See also: fare, up