fantod


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fantods

A state of nervousness or unease. Callie's pacing because she's got a case of the fantods today.
See also: fantod

howling fantods

old-fashioned Extreme disquiet of the body and mind; anxious or nervous unease. My poor mother was afflicted with the howling fantods for the rest of her life following the accident. Just thinking about going out on a stage in front of hundreds of people to give my presentation is enough to give me the howling fantods.
See also: fantod, howling

screaming fantods

old-fashioned Extreme disquiet of the body and mind; anxious or nervous unease. My poor mother was afflicted with the screaming fantods for the rest of her life following the accident. Just thinking about going out on a stage in front of hundreds of people to give my presentation is enough to give me the screaming fantods.
See also: fantod, scream

screaming fantods

and (howling) fantods
n. extreme anxiety; nervous hysteria. (Old. One might call this vintage literary mock colloquial, since it survives in the works of well-known writers and occasional literary use. The origin is unknown, but the Oxford English Dictionary lists Fantad with the same meaning, and cautiously suggests that is related to fantasy and similar words containing fan.) The afternoon’s excitement has left Lady Waddington with a case of the screaming fantods. The reviewer felt that any slang dictionary that excluded “fantods” was defective.
See also: fantod, scream

howling fantods

verb
See also: fantod, howling

fantods

verb
See also: fantod
References in periodicals archive ?
Yn ystod y rhaglen bydd Sarah yn edrych ar sefyllfa'r ani fail yn y gwyllt ac yn ymweld ag amddifaty sy'n gofalu am elif fantod bach sydd wedi colli eu mamau.
It was random enough to give statisticians the screaming fantods.
In Fantods, we take a look back at some of the most significant of these articles and essays (as well as some appearing in other publications), many of which strive to define risk and others that aim to broaden these definitions.
"Now is the time for all good citizens to come to the aid of our country, and it won't help if you all cower in places like Madison and the Upper West Side, having hot fantods over the approach of fascism.
Affection for it may not extend much beyond fans of 19th-century literature who can take pleasure in hearing words like "rodomontade," "faugh" and "fantods" resurrected, albeit in a tale of quarreling lesbian lovers that would have observers of the Victorian era in which it is set reaching for their smelling salts.
Instead of passions, they've got the fantods. They are nervous and jerky.
Dillard's prose is simultaneously crowded and vibrant: She deals out details of the natural world (the men stand on a ten-foot platform to avoid having to saw through many extra feet of gummy, pitch-laden bark that swells near the ground); she flatters us with a vocabulary so patently unabridged that 1, for one, read her books in the company of a good dictionary (one of the two men realizes his ignorance and it "gives him the fantods"); her descriptions tend to arrest the mind's eye in its tracks (as the men drew the crosscut saw between them, "muscles moved all over their two backs like salmon in creeks").
Numerous characters suffer a kind of existential dread--sometimes referred to as "The Howling Fantods"--that is often related to their own sense of loss, depression, and neuroses, in Understanding David Foster Wallace, Marshall Boswell discusses the existential concerns raised in the novel and conducts a compelling reading of the "existentialist" (2) philosophy found in Kierkegaard's Either/Or as it relates to the "aesthetes" (Kierkegaard's term for hedonists inadequately protected from depression by their sophistication and irony) in Infinite Jest who attempt to escape the self through hip irony (Boswell 137-41, 143-45).