familiarity breeds contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Repeated exposure to someone or something often creates a contentious relationship. A: "Those two teams have built up quite a rivalry over the years." B: "They play in the same division, and familiarity breeds contempt." I've been stuck with Larry in the office all week, and I'm afraid they're right that familiary breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Prov. People do not respect someone they know well enough to know his or her faults. The movie star doesn't let anyone get to know him, because he knows that familiarity breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Long experience of someone or something can make one so aware of the faults as to be scornful. For example, Ten years at the same job and now he hates it-familiarity breeds contempt. The idea is much older, but the first recorded use of this expression was in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee (c. 1386).
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

If you say that familiarity breeds contempt, you mean that if you know someone or something very well, you can easily become bored with them and stop treating them with respect. Of course, it's often true that familiarity breeds contempt, that we're attracted to those who seem so different from those we know at home. It is second-year drivers — when familiarity breeds contempt for road rules — that are the problem. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of contempt. Familiarity breeds inattention. Typically, family members are so convinced they know what another family member is going to say that they don't bother to listen.
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds conˈtempt

(saying) you have little respect, liking, etc. for somebody/something that you know too well: George’s father is regarded by everyone as a great artist, but George doesn’t think he is. Familiarity breeds contempt!
See also: breed, contempt
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes it's a case of familiarity breeds contempt, sometimes it's sheer laziness, while in some cases it's a matter of physically being unable to get up there.
GLENN Hoddle is hoping familiarity breeds contempt for Plymouth's overworked defenders as Wolves tackle the Pilgrims for the second successive Saturday in tomorrow's FA Cup tie.
Absence makes the heart grow fonder; but familiarity breeds contempt, and out of sight, out of mind.
They are at risk (a) because they have a higher exposure rate, but mainly (b) because familiarity breeds contempt.
SINCE familiarity breeds contempt, England and Australia will be sick of each other after 66 days of international cricket between now and February.
FAMILIARITY breeds contempt but as far as Nuneaton Town and tomorrow's visitors Luton are concerned it's more like mutual respect.
e old adage that familiarity breeds contempt isn't true, it actually breeds regard.
Familiarity breeds contempt, which explains the sometimes less-than-warm welcome given to a lovely (if melodramatic) song such as Barry Manilow's "Mandy" or the Ronettes' soulful "Be My Baby.
I think it must be true that familiarity breeds contempt.
There's always a danger familiarity breeds contempt but the Triple Crown is still worth winning," he said.
Now there are other players at the same level - Wayne Rooney, Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard - and I think familiarity breeds contempt where Becks is concerned.
And the man who has spent 11 years preparing for his first manager's post, insisted there is no reason for Motherwell players to feel that familiarity breeds contempt.
Of course, studios walk a fine line between benefiting from recognition and the prospect that familiarity breeds contempt.
They say familiarity breeds contempt and the ubiquitous Ford Focus is certainly a familiar sight.