familiarity breeds contempt

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familiarity breeds contempt

Repeated exposure to someone or something often creates a contentious relationship. A: "Those two teams have built up quite a rivalry over the years." B: "They play in the same division, and familiarity breeds contempt." I'm afraid it's true when they say that familiarity breeds contempt, because I've been stuck with Larry in the apartment all week, and I'm absolutely sick of him.
See also: breed, contempt
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Prov. People do not respect someone they know well enough to know his or her faults. The movie star doesn't let anyone get to know him, because he knows that familiarity breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

familiarity breeds contempt

Long experience of someone or something can make one so aware of the faults as to be scornful. For example, Ten years at the same job and now he hates it-familiarity breeds contempt. The idea is much older, but the first recorded use of this expression was in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee (c. 1386).
See also: breed, contempt
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

familiarity breeds contempt

If you say that familiarity breeds contempt, you mean that if you know someone or something very well, you can easily become bored with them and stop treating them with respect. Of course, it's often true that familiarity breeds contempt, that we're attracted to those who seem so different from those we know at home. It is second-year drivers — when familiarity breeds contempt for road rules — that are the problem. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of contempt. Familiarity breeds inattention. Typically, family members are so convinced they know what another family member is going to say that they don't bother to listen.
See also: breed, contempt
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

familiarity breeds conˈtempt

(saying) you have little respect, liking, etc. for somebody/something that you know too well: George’s father is regarded by everyone as a great artist, but George doesn’t think he is. Familiarity breeds contempt!
See also: breed, contempt
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

familiarity breeds contempt

Overexposure to or knowing something or someone too thoroughly can turn liking into hostility. The idea behind this expression dates from ancient times—the Roman writer Publilius Syrus used it about 43 b.c.—and approximately twelve hundred years later Pope Innocent III repeated it, also in Latin. The first record of it in English appeared in Nicholas Udall’s translation of Erasmus’s sayings (1548): “Familiaritye bringeth contempt.” Later writers often stated it with humor or irony, notably Mark Twain in his unpublished diaries (Notebooks, ca. 1900): “Familiarity breeds contempt—and children.”
See also: breed, contempt
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The dependent variables were individual rates of hits (H) and false alarms (FA) on R and K judgments, total "yes" (R+K) H and FA judgments, FA on new pairs (Table 1), and estimations of recollection and familiarity using the PD and RK procedures (Table 2).
As above described, the activation-based memory mechanism provides a fast judgment on familiarity. However, there is a binary result of judgment: old and new.
The familiarity effect produced by this induced perceptual and phonological fluency, can be estimated comparing this condition in which the letters are used for improving recognition (reducing false alarms and/or increasing hits) in comparison with a control condition in which they do not have this perceptual information available (using target and distracter words created from the full alphabet; e.g.
However, an extensively used procedure to estimate the weight of familiarity, particularly in neuropsychology (e.g.
Additionally, image agreement and familiarity for each picture needed to average a 3 or greater on the associated 5 point Likert-type scale to be allowed into the set, averaging a 4.08 and 4.42 respectively.
The same principles of maintaining familiarity still apply.
Psychological research has shown that familiarity with a face is virtually impossible to lose and so this system is naturally robust.
"I hope that your familiarity with the issues of the relations of Iran and England and your presence once in Tehran will be a considerable help to get rid of existing obstacles in the growth and expansion of relations between us," Rouhani said in the statement.
'The familiarity is a factor but what I really like about Rob and why I wanted him to our import is his ability on the defensive end,' Alas, who is in his second season as Phoenix's head coach, told INQUIRER.net in Filipino before Game 1 of the Fuel Masters' best-of-seven semifinals series against the San Miguel Beermen Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena.
To quote Sam Phillips, "If you're not doing something different, you're not doing anything." Discover how familiarity is keeping you stuck in a false sense of security and what to do for your business and personal objectives.
Change is often unsettling and even in change we are often left seeking frantically for a piece of familiarity that we can grab on to while we wade across the new and unfamiliar waters.
Their familiarity with Him got in the way of their faith.
Lucia head coach George Pascua, the victory should be credited to his deep familiarity with the HD Spikers.
If research participants lack familiarity with specialized terminology used to determine opinions, researchers will not be able to determine consumers' true feelings toward the technology (Sturgis & Allum, 2004; Sturgis, Brunton-Smith, & Fife-Schaw, 2010; Wynne, 2006).
Live football BT Sport 2, 7.45pm IF it's true that familiarity breeds contempt then referee Martin Atkinson will need to have his wits about him for the first leg of Real Madrid's Champions League semi-final against neighbours Atletico, writes James Milton.