fall into the trap of (doing something)

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fall into the trap of (doing something)

To succumb to doing something foolish or irresponsible. After college, I fell into the trap of using credit cards, and I've been deep in debt ever since.
See also: fall, of, trap

fall into the trap

COMMON If someone falls into the trap of doing something, they make a very common mistake, or one that is very easy to make. School administrators often fall into the trap of thinking that discipline problems are the cause of low levels of achievement. I refuse to fall into the trap of washing his dishes for him.
See also: fall, trap

fall into/avoid the trap of doing something

do/avoid doing something that is a mistake but which seems at first to be a good idea: Parents sometimes fall into the trap of trying to do everything for their children.
See also: avoid, fall, of, something, trap
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the author falls into the trap of assuming because liberal and progressive elements took the high ground on race in the past, they must be politically and intellectually correct as to related matters in the present.
Though he falls into the trap of feeling too great an empathy, Cumings is one of the few American experts who read Korean and possess a deep, sophisticated grasp of modern Korean history and culture.
Yet she repeatedly falls into the trap of oversimplification -- as in her summaries of sixteenth-century humanism, Post-Tridentine ritual or French Romanticism -- and she adheres to art historical assumptions that tend to interfere with the interpretation of images -- as in her description of Vasari's mannerist tendencies.
The author also falls into the trap of discussing change without providing a baseline for what changed.
Children's theater often falls into the trap of high moralism, reducing life to sharply defined opposites.
The face of the artist, or her profile, sometimes falls into the trap of these affinitative interlacings.
He also falls into the trap of examining only the pampas region on the Argentine frontier without looking at the effects on the other side of the Andes, in what later became Chile.