fall by (some amount)

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fall by (some amount)

To decrease by a specific amount. Often used of stocks. The stocks market only fell by a few points today.
See also: by, fall
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fall by (some amount)

[for an asset] to drop in value by a certain amount. The gas stocks fell by nearly 1.0 percent today. If the stock market falls by four hundred points, I'm going to jump off a cliff.
See also: by, fall
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Direct treatment costs from falls by older adults are projected to escalate to $4.2 billion annually by 2020 (CDC, 2016).
In fact, health care-based interventions --such as assessing patients for balance and better managing medication side effects that affect fall risk--could reduce falls by 24 percent.
Falls by hospitalised elderly patients: causes, prevention.
The fall-detection system implemented in this paper consisted of a sensor node with a 3-axis accelerometer [+ or -] 8 g triaxial accelerometer (BMA150, Bosch) [30] and wireless communication module (CC2530, Texas Instrument) [31], a gateway to collect the information from multiple wireless sensor nodes, and a server to determine falls by applying the parameters from the 3-axis acceleration to the proposed fall-detection algorithm.
Nurses can obtain and detect the risk factors associated with patients who are at high-risk for falls by enhancing the understanding and communication to elderly patients while performing a nursing risk assessment.
Its goal was to reduce falls by 25 percent from its implementation from October 2010 to October 2011.
Although self-reporting of falls by subjects could have biased our findings, because there is no accurate alternative to self-report, fall calendars are considered the gold standard for measuring falls prospectively [34].
In common areas throughout the two facilities (each with about 230 beds), the investigators used 270 digital video cameras to record 184 falls by 124 residents during a 2-year period.
The findings also suggest that reducing fear of falling is not likely to increase the risk of falls by making older people overly confident, they add.
Data Source: Prospective study of 184 video-recorded falls by 124 older adults in two long-term care facilities.
Investigators had previously determined that stopping specific medications in elderly patients with a history of falls reduced the incidence of falls by 50 percent.
Certain ants that live 30 or so meters up in tropical trees can save themselves in midair from ruinous falls by making moves previously known only in cheesy action films.
A limitation to this study was the reliance on self-reports of falls by the subjects.
Staff reviewed residents' pattern of falls by shift and time to determine their relation to periodic or general confusion when residents were tired or waiting to get into bed.