fall

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fall

1. verb To be arrested for a crime. Can you believe that mob kingpin finally fell?
2. noun One's arrest for a crime. I refuse to take the fall when I was barely involved in this to begin with.

fall

1. in. to be arrested; to be charged with a crime. (see also fall guy.) I heard that Mooshoo fell. Is that right?
2. n. one’s arrest; being arrested and charged. (Underworld.) Who took the fall for the bank job?

fall

foul/afoul
1. Nautical To collide. Used of vessels.
2. To clash: fell foul of the law.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
A comprehensive approach was taken to educate nursing staff, implement a falls program, and support nurses in the management of patients identified as at high risk for falling.
If HIV providers use frailty to predict falls--which can lead to broken bones and other problems--they can identify people with a higher risk of falling and work harder with those people to prevent falls.
However, the only difference in frequency of falling which achieved statistical significance was between males and females (p = 0.025).
A total of 40% of the patients and 30% of the controls reported fear of falling (p=0.042).
After education of staff was completed and the program was implemented, feedback indicated that the Humpty Dumpty Fall Scale tool was helpful for screening in clinical practice and heightened awareness about patients who were at risk for falling (Rouse et al., 2014).
Although validation of risk assessment tools with high sensitivity and specificity has been challenged in a variety of clinical settings, putting attention to common reversible risk factors can predict and help in prevention of fall.19 In order to enhance the generalisability, these fall risk assessment tools should be meticulously evaluated in diverse clinical situations.20 Although implementation of fall prevention programmes may not be able to prevent or reduce the chance of falling in patients, it can reduce the chance of injury and severity of injury.
Unlike with my garden-variety clumsy falls, I had no awareness that "I'm about to fall" or "I tripped over something and now I'm falling." I just went down.
One limitation of this study is that the fall-detection algorithm was tested on subjects in the age group 20-50, falling under simulated conditions.
The informed patient: hospitals aim to curb injuries from falling: risk for young patients.
Even if the patient does not experience a physical injury from the fall, it can lead to a fear of falling.
There is something in the sound and sight of falling water that both refreshes and inspires us.
A number of studies demonstrate that people with MS fall frequently [3-7] and suffer from various sequelae of falls, including injury [5, 8, 9] and death [10], fear of falling, and reduced participation in occupational and leisure activities [11, 12].
MORE older people die from falling over accidentally in Conwy and Denbighshire than anywhere else in Wales.
Further, falls are more common in institutional settings, with twice the number of nursing home residents falling each year (Rubenstein, 2006).