fall to (something)

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fall to (something)

1. To start to do something with energy and enthusiasm. Once I set out the paints, the kids fell to it eagerly. The men sat down at the bar and fell to drinking for the rest of the night.
2. To deteriorate to some unstable or decrepit state. This car has started falling to pieces! We really need to replace it soon. The castle, once so grand, has fallen to ruin in recent times.
3. To lose control of one's nerve or emotions. Usually used in the phrase "fall to bits/pieces." Poor Jane really fell to pieces during the funeral service. Jack knew this was his last chance to impress the board of directors, but he fell to bits under all the pressure.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fall to someone

Fig. to become the responsibility of someone. It always falls to me to apologize first. Why does it fall to me to answer the telephone every time it rings?
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fall to

to begin doing something; to prepare to do something and go to work on it. She asked for help, and everyone fell to. Fall to, you guys!
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McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fall to

Energetically begin an activity, set to work, as in As soon as they had the right tools, they fell to work on the house. This expression is also often used to mean "begin to eat." Charles Dickens so used it in American Notes (1842): "We fall-to upon these dainties." [Late 1500s]
See also: fall
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fall to

v.
1. To be passed on to someone as a duty or responsibility; be incumbent upon someone: Now that your brothers and sisters are at college, it falls to you to mow the lawn.
2. To begin an activity energetically: When I entered high school, I fell to soccer with a passion.
See also: fall
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
So it went, then, that on one such call, the Tier 1 EMS noted its days payable figure had fallen to something like 68 days from something like 72 the previous quarter.
But by the next census, population levels had fallen to something closer to what we have now, likely a sign of that very migration to the suburbs enabled by the car in every garage.