fall into oblivion

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fall into oblivion

1. To become lost to obscurity; to not be known or remembered by anyone. The poet fell into oblivion after the war, only coming back into public awareness after an archive of his works was discovered in the basement of an abandoned warehouse in East Germany. He held a rather cynical view of parenthood, believing that people only had children to avoid falling into oblivion.
2. To enter into total unconsciousness. The last thing I remember was the doctor asking me to count to ten before the general anesthetic took effect and I fell into oblivion. He was so utterly exhausted that he fell into oblivion the moment my head hit the pillow.
See also: fall, oblivion
References in classic literature ?
As the General glanced back at Esther Dudley's antique figure, he deemed her well fitted for such a charge, as being so perfect a representative of the decayed past--of an age gone by, with its manners, opinions, faith and feelings, all fallen into oblivion or scorn--of what had once been a reality, but was now merely a vision of faded magnificence.
That has led to the 19-year-old being called Real's "forgotten man", while newspaper Marca - who are close to Madrid - say he has "fallen into oblivion".
This story of transparency that Ronicke recounts is also the story of art history, which has only recently begun to revisit its shadowed areas and finally to cast light on the works and heritage of numerous women artists who have fallen into oblivion or who are underrecognized.
Amid this melee, the term 'productivity' has fallen into oblivion.
Somehow this part of sporting history has fallen into oblivion, but author Paul Marshall of Shilbottle has somehow managed to trawl the archives to bring it all back to light as he asks the readers who they think really is King of the Peds.
Without these factors, he would probably have fallen into oblivion. He ruled for nine years, achieving little of any import during his reign but leaving the world a fabulous legacy of golden treasures, including a collection of ornate funereal artefacts, never seen before outside Cairo, which are on display in Paris
The Commissioner is warned that the Green Paper on entrepreneurship must not suffer the same fate as the White Paper on Trade, which has fallen into oblivion.
This was reflected on other levels in Some Chance Operations as well, in which Green set out on the traces of the Neapolitan silent film director Elvira Notart, whose once popular work has largely fallen into oblivion.