fall on one's feet

fall on (one's) feet

To adeptly survive a difficult ordeal or situation without suffering any major negative consequences. I wouldn't worry about Chloe—no matter what bizarre scheme she gets mixed up in, she always falls on her feet.
See also: fall, feet, on

fall on one's feet

Also, land on one's feet. Overcome difficulties, be restored to a sound or stable condition. For example, Don't worry about Joe's losing his job two years in a row-he always falls on his feet, or The company went bankrupt, but the following year it was restructured and landed on its feet . This term alludes to the cat and its remarkable ability to land on its paws after falling from a great height. [Mid-1800s]
See also: fall, feet, on

fall on one's feet, to

To make a lucky recovery from potential disaster. The term alludes to the cat, which has a remarkable ability to land on its paws after falling or being tossed from a height. The analogy was made long ago, appearing in John Ray’s proverb collection of 1678 (“He’s like a cat; fling him which way you will he’ll light on ’s legs”) and was certainly a cliché by the time William Roughead wrote (Malice Domestic, 1929), “That lady had indeed, as the phrase is, fallen on her feet.”
See also: fall, on