fall into disfavor

fall into disfavor

To no longer be supported, preferred, or highly regarded. John fell into disfavor with his boss ever since he managed to drive away the firm's most lucrative client. They were a fad, that's all—they're already falling into disfavor.
See also: fall

fall into disfavor

to lose one's influence; to be preferred less and less. This style of government fell into disfavor some years ago. Poor Lee fell into disfavor with the boss and lost all his special privileges.
See also: fall
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, nine officials have resigned or been dismissed from Trump's Cabinet since 2017, and the president regularly uses Twitter (and even presidential pardons) to reward loyalty or to bully those who fall into disfavor. In the U.K., Brexiteers' attacks on the U.K.
What was popular can fall into disfavor. What was ignored can become important.
Germain said he did not feel there was anything in particular that caused him to fall into disfavor with the voters.
Some products like fresh poultry and fresh prepared foods may fall into disfavor, causing both a major shift in demand and in staffing for service departments.
The United States is not the only country in which corporations fall into disfavor from time to time.
But with challenge, of course, comes opportunity And cutting-edge products--the lifeblood of electronics manufacturers--aren't about to fall into disfavor, even during a recession.
* Have students complete research projects on other animal artists of the nineteenth century, in particular, the French artist Troyon and the English artist Landseer, comparing their work to Bonheur's and considering why the work of these painters was to fall into disfavor with the advent of Impressionism.
The latter model, known as the rubble pile, seemed to fall into disfavor as astronomers witnessed the Jovian fireworks.