fall for something/someone, to

fall for someone

Fig. to fall in love with someone. I fell for her in a big way. She's gorgeous! Ted fell for Alice and they decided to get married.
See also: fall

fall for something

Fig. to believe something without reservation. Surely, you don't expect me to fall for that! She fell for the excuse I gave her about getting stuck in traffic.
See also: fall
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fall for

1. Become attracted to, as in I was sure he'd fall for her. [Slang; early 1900s]
2. Be deceived or swindled by, as in He fell for the con artist's scheme and lost a great deal of money. [Slang; early 1900s]
See also: fall
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fall for

v.
1. To feel love for someone; be in love with someone: I fell for you the first time I saw you in the park. They immediately fell for each other.
2. To be deceived or swindled by something: The gullible dupe fell for the con artist's scheme and lost $200,000.
See also: fall
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fall for something/someone, to

To be taken in or deceived; or to be captivated by or enamored of. Originating in American slang in the late nineteenth century, the expression was adopted on both sides of the Atlantic. The two meanings are differentiated by the context. The first sense is meant in “The mayor fell for it” (R. L. McCardell, Conversations with a Chorus Girl, 1903), and the second in “I fell for her the first time I seen her” (Saturday Evening Post, 1914).
See also: fall, something
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: