fall for something/someone, to

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fall for someone

Fig. to fall in love with someone. I fell for her in a big way. She's gorgeous! Ted fell for Alice and they decided to get married.
See also: fall

fall for something

Fig. to believe something without reservation. Surely, you don't expect me to fall for that! She fell for the excuse I gave her about getting stuck in traffic.
See also: fall

fall for

1. Become attracted to, as in I was sure he'd fall for her. [Slang; early 1900s]
2. Be deceived or swindled by, as in He fell for the con artist's scheme and lost a great deal of money. [Slang; early 1900s]
See also: fall

fall for

v.
1. To feel love for someone; be in love with someone: I fell for you the first time I saw you in the park. They immediately fell for each other.
2. To be deceived or swindled by something: The gullible dupe fell for the con artist's scheme and lost $200,000.
See also: fall

fall for something/someone, to

To be taken in or deceived; or to be captivated by or enamored of. Originating in American slang in the late nineteenth century, the expression was adopted on both sides of the Atlantic. The two meanings are differentiated by the context. The first sense is meant in “The mayor fell for it” (R. L. McCardell, Conversations with a Chorus Girl, 1903), and the second in “I fell for her the first time I seen her” (Saturday Evening Post, 1914).
See also: fall, something
References in periodicals archive ?
"Never did I think I would fall for something like this, but every time I wondered if it was real he was really convincing.
While it's unclear exactly why Ghost needs an alibi seeing as he has committed so many crimes, he may have to set up an innocent person to take the fall for something they didn't do.
Gemma Somers agreed, adding: "It's pretty naive and gullible to fall for something like that."
You don't want to find that you fall for something that looks great in pictures, but in practice is far too difficult to maintain in the real world.
The truth seems clear: whatever our backgrounds and however rationally we may tend to act in the normal course of our lives, we do fall for something when we know it's not going to end well.
"We feel strongly that if our mother-whowasasensibleand cautious woman - could fall for something like this, then anybody could.
Aliens." But what's the ideal opening weekend this fall for something like "Run, Fat Boy, Run" or "Before the Devil Knows You're Dead"?
There are also some ravishing prints and so from this gorgeous collection take it from me you'll probably fall for something, since this gallery is where dreams of owning an affordable but lovely picture are finally fulfilled.
"I never thought I could fall for something like this but they were so convincing - never nasty or abusive, just very insistent."
And when you do fall for something, you want to surround yourself with it.
The lesson from all of this is the following: whether it's Google+ invites, free iPads, or (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2011/06/mark-zuckerberg-facebook-to-launch-something-awesome.html) Facebook's "awesome" thing next week , don't fall for something that's too good to be true and from a source that you haven't verified.
One of their hardest-hit victims was a retired teacher who now says: "I never thought I could fall for something like this, but they were so convincing."
To think that after all this time I would fall for something like this.'
"You've got to be very naive to fall for something like this.