fairy tale

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fairy tale

1. noun A lie or fabricated account of something (likened to a clearly fictional fantasy story). I know he's telling me fairy tales to avoid admitting his mistakes.
2. adjective Resembling a fantasy story, especially due to being entirely positive or happy or having a happy ending. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. I really want a fairy-tale wedding, complete with a beautiful gown and a fancy cake. It wasn't some fairy-tale marriage, you know. We had our problems.
See also: fairy, tale
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fairy tale

and bedtime story
n. a simplistic and condescending explanation for something; a lie. I don’t want to hear a fairy tale, just the facts, ma’am. I’ve already heard your little bedtime story. You’ll have to do better than that!
See also: fairy, tale
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reimagining possibilities for fairy tales is in part accomplished through the structural reliance on fairy-tale fragments instead of whole tales.
In her study, Duggan combines film theory and queer theory, as well as fairy-tale studies, to underscore the "queerness" of Demy's films against a socio-cultural backdrop of postwar France in the 1950s and '60s, where heterosexuality and consumerism were promulgated as ideal social norms.
Divided into an intriguing introduction, four elaborately structured and styled chapters, and a compelling epilogue, the book highlights interwoven-and-yet-divergent social projects envisioned and instigated by fairy-tale adaptations circulating in modern popular culture.
At the same time, however, it struggles to define the fairy-tale world and the ordering of significant events in the novel clearly.
However, far from providing simplistic, happily-ever-after solutions in Hawthorne's fiction, fairy-tale imagery, allusions, and narrative structures complicate our reading.
Fantasy and fairy-tale lovers should enjoy this story.
Although she has made a name for herself with her novels, some of which have been published in the United States, it is in the modern fairy-tale genre that she finds herself at home and excels as a storyteller.
The first text Hans Christian Andersen called a ``fairy-tale'' was The Diving Bell: A Fairy-tale from the Bottom of the Ocean, which appeared in 1827 in Johan Ludvig Heiberg's literary magazine KjAbenhavns flyvende Post.
Dasgupta's stories, however, diverge from those of Chaucer in adopting the fairy-tale genre to enliven the narrative.
By strategically employing these means, Fauset parodies fairy tale motifs in African American life and devises a strategy of survival rooted in "double double consciousness." In spite of their endowments of beauty and their longing for riches and happiness, both protagonists, contrary to their idealized fairy-tale models and the conventional images of African American women, possess assertive personalities, materialistic attitudes that confound their emotions, and a desire for happiness rendered difficult by racial and gender categorizations.
A second Italian writer, Giambattista Basile (1575-1632), further nourished the European fairy-tale tradition by creating fifty stories, which brought scores of plots (including 'Rapunzel' and 'Cinderella') and magical motifs from ancient sources into the modern Italian and northern European tradition.
Bruno Bettelheim's essay, "The Struggle for Meaning" (376-391) appears to build, to some extent, on Max Luthi's essay "The Fairy-Tale Hero: The Image of Man in the Fairy Tale" (365-376).
Chapter 5, "The Disenchantment of Power: Kings and Courtiers," views the incompetent kings of Basile's fables as veiled parodies of Spanish viceroys, and interprets fairy-tale courtiers as reflecting Basile's checkered career.