faint

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be not for the faint-hearted

To be unsuitable for those who are easily stressed or frightened. That horror movie is definitely not for the faint-hearted. I don't scare easily, and I screamed the whole time! Working in an operating room is not for the faint-hearted.
See also: not

not have the faintest idea

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. I do not have the faintest idea where I left my car keys. He does not have the faintest idea how hard it is to run a business.
See also: faint, have, idea, not

damn (someone or something) with faint praise

To criticize or undermine someone or something by showing a lack of enthusiasm. I needed you to support me in there! The committee probably won't approve of my research project now that you've damned it with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

not have the foggiest (notion)

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. He doesn't have the foggiest notion how hard it is to run a business. A: "Do you know where the car keys are?" B: "I haven't the foggiest. Sorry."
See also: foggy, have, not

not have the faintest (notion)

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. He doesn't have the faintest notion how hard it is to run a business. A: "Do you know where the car keys are?" B: "I don't have the faintest, sorry."
See also: faint, have, not

a faint heart

1. A tendency to experience stress, fear, anxiety, sickness, or discomfort from unpleasantness, graphic imagery, physical strain, or risk. We must warn you that the following video contains images that may be unsuitable to those with a faint heart. I wouldn't advise reading the comments section of this article if you have a faint heart. Part of the hike is along a narrow path very close to a sheer cliff, so it's certainly not for anyone with a faint heart!
2. To have a very timid disposition; to lack the ambition or will to achieve success despite adversity. You can't have a faint heart if you want to work in this industry, I'll tell you that right now.
See also: faint, heart

the faint of heart

A person who tends to easily experience stress, fear, anxiety, sickness, or discomfort when facing unpleasantness, graphic imagery, physical strain, or risk. We must warn you that the following video contains images that may be unsuitable for the faint of heart. Part of the hike is along a narrow path very close to a sheer cliff, so it's certainly not for the faint of heart!
See also: faint, heart, of

faint dead away

To lose consciousness; to pass out. I don't know what happened, I just got dizzy all of a sudden and fainted dead away.
See also: away, dead, faint

faint from (something)

To lose consciousness for a particular reason. We had to wait in line at the amusement park for so long that I fainted from the heat.
See also: faint

faint heart never won fair lady

One must be self-assured and brave, as opposed to timid, in order to attract or woo a woman. I know you get nervous talking to your crush, but just remember—faint heart never won fair lady.
See also: faint, fair, heart, lady, never, won

damn someone or something with faint praise

Fig. to criticize someone or something indirectly by not praising enthusiastically. The critic did not say that he disliked the play, but he damned it with faint praise. Mrs. Brown is very proud of her son's achievements, but damns her daughter's with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

faint dead away

Fig. to faint and fall unconscious. I almost fainted dead away. David will faint dead away when he reads this.
See also: away, dead, faint

faint from something

to faint because of something. I nearly fainted from fear! Three people along the parade route fainted from the heat.
See also: faint

Faint heart never won fair lady.

Prov. A timid suitor never won his lady. (Used to encourage boys or men to be bold in courting women.) Bill: I'd really like to go out with Alice, but what if she says no? Alan: You won't know till you ask her. Faint heart never won fair lady. Don't be so shy about talking to Edith. Faint heart never won fair lady.
See also: faint, fair, heart, lady, never, won

faint of heart

Fig. people who are squeamish; someone who is sickened or disturbed by unpleasantness or challenge. The pathway around the top of the volcano, near the crater, is not for the faint of heart.
See also: faint, heart, of

damn with faint praise

Compliment so feebly that it amounts to no compliment at all, or even implies condemnation. For example, The reviewer damned the singer with faint praise, admiring her dress but not mentioning her voice . This idea was already expressed in Roman times by Favorinus (c. a.d. 110) but the actual expression comes from Alexander Pope's Epistle to Doctor Arbuthnot (1733): "Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, and, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer."
See also: damn, faint, praise

damn someone/something with faint praise

If you damn someone or something with faint praise, you praise them, but in such a weak way that it is obvious that you do not really have a high opinion of them. In recent months he has consistently damned the government with faint praise. Note: People occasionally use by instead of with. He has been damned by faint praise throughout his career even though he has scored all manner of important goals. Note: You can also just talk about faint praise. Mr Robinson called him `the most obvious candidate'. That sounds like faint praise. Note: This expression was first used by the English writer Alexander Pope in his `Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot' (1735): `Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer.'

damn someone or something with faint praise

praise someone or something so unenthusiastically as to imply condemnation.
This expression comes from the poet Alexander Pope's ‘Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ ( 1735 ): ‘Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer’.
1994 Canadian Defence Quarterly True there is the occasional condescending nod to those who served, but this frequently amounts to damning with faint praise.

a faint heart

timidity or lack of willpower preventing you from achieving your objective.
Faint heart never won fair lady is a proverb which dates in this wording from the early 17th century; the idea, however, was around at least two centuries earlier.
See also: faint, heart

not have the faintest (idea)

have no idea. informal
See also: faint, have, not

damn somebody/something with faint ˈpraise

praise somebody/something so little that you seem to be criticizing them/it: All he said was that I was ‘capable’. Talk about damning someone with faint praise!

not have the ˈfaintest/ˈfoggiest (idea)

(British English, informal) have no idea at all about something; not know anything at all: I haven’t got the faintest idea what to buy Roger for his birthday.‘Where are we?’ ‘I’m afraid I haven’t the foggiest.’
See also: faint, foggy, have, not

damn with faint praise, to

To compliment so slightly that it amounts to no compliment at all, or even the reverse, a condemnation. The Roman writer Favorinus said, about a.d. 110, that it is more shameful to be praised faintly and coldly than to be censured violently. The practice was taken up early on, especially by literary critics. The classic quotation is from Alexander Pope’s Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot (1733). In poking fun at the critic Joseph Addison, here called Atticus, Pope said he would “Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, and, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer.” See also left-handed compliment.
See also: damn, faint
References in periodicals archive ?
"It's phenomenal how many patients report presyncopal symptoms such as faintness and dizziness," Dr.
Compared with the other groups, patients receiving risperidone experienced higher rates of adverse effects involving sexual functioning, and patients receiving quetiapine experienced significantly more orthostatic faintness.
Sometimes, momentarily, you can have a feeling of faintness and the symptoms you experienced.
They reported to emergency departments within 6 days complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and light-headedness or faintness. Both were afebrile, tachycardic, tachypneic, and hypotensive.
Springfield police put caution tape across the driveway of the vacant home, and paramedics evaluated Norma Perez, who complained of faintness.
[] faintness not relieved by lying down or light-headedness that continues after standing two minutes
* What if I experience chest pain, faintness or dizziness, bone or joint pain while exercising?
Symptoms include: pale skin, sluggishness, shortness of breath, frequent colds, dizziness, faintness, thirst or sweating (on top of hot flashes!).
ATHIS is when one chamber of the heart beats too fast and doesn't pump blood properly, causing faintness and missed beats.
I sleep-walked through college suffering from extreme fatigue, back and joint pain, faintness, headaches, digestive problems, and a myriad of other symptoms that didn't seem related to each other.
A lack of it can lead to osteoporosis, brittle bones, faintness and mood swings, and according to a Harvard University study, women who take Vitamin D supplements are 40 per cent less likely to develop multiple sclerosis.
MDMA can also cause physical difficulties, such as faintness, nausea, muscle tension, blurred vision, involuntary teeth clenching, and chills or sweating.
The elderly are particularly at risk, with common symptoms including confusion, faintness, a fast pulse and nausea.
'The victim may develop headache, slurred speech, dizziness, faintness, hallucinations, seizures, and may even become comatose as the body temperature soars to 104 degrees Fahrenheit or more.
"To speak of its merit I can only say that in looking at it my whole frame contracted, my blood shivered, and I felt a faintness in my heart," wrote Mrs.