faint

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be not for the faint-hearted

To be unsuitable for those who are easily stressed or frightened. That horror movie is definitely not for the faint-hearted. I don't scare easily, and I screamed the whole time! Working in an operating room is not for the faint-hearted.
See also: not

not have the faintest idea

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. I do not have the faintest idea where I left my car keys. He does not have the faintest idea how hard it is to run a business.
See also: faint, have, idea, not

damn (someone or something) with faint praise

To criticize or undermine someone or something by showing a lack of enthusiasm. I needed you to support me in there! The committee probably won't approve of my research project now that you've damned it with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

not have the foggiest (notion)

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. He doesn't have the foggiest notion how hard it is to run a business. A: "Do you know where the car keys are?" B: "I haven't the foggiest. Sorry."
See also: foggy, have, not

not have the faintest (notion)

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. He doesn't have the faintest notion how hard it is to run a business. A: "Do you know where the car keys are?" B: "I haven't the faintest, sorry."
See also: faint, have, not

a faint heart

1. A tendency to experience stress, fear, anxiety, sickness, or discomfort from unpleasantness, graphic imagery, physical strain, or risk. We must warn you that the following video contains images that may be unsuitable to those with a faint heart. I wouldn't advise reading the comments section of this article if you have a faint heart. Part of the hike is along a narrow path very close to a sheer cliff, so it's certainly not for anyone with a faint heart!
2. To have a very timid disposition; to lack the ambition or will to achieve success despite adversity. You can't have a faint heart if you want to work in this industry, I'll tell you that right now.
See also: faint, heart

the faint of heart

A person who tends to easily experience stress, fear, anxiety, sickness, or discomfort when facing unpleasantness, graphic imagery, physical strain, or risk. We must warn you that the following video contains images that may be unsuitable for the faint of heart. Part of the hike is along a narrow path very close to a sheer cliff, so it's certainly not for the faint of heart!
See also: faint, heart, of

damn someone or something with faint praise

Fig. to criticize someone or something indirectly by not praising enthusiastically. The critic did not say that he disliked the play, but he damned it with faint praise. Mrs. Brown is very proud of her son's achievements, but damns her daughter's with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

faint dead away

Fig. to faint and fall unconscious. I almost fainted dead away. David will faint dead away when he reads this.
See also: away, dead, faint

faint from something

to faint because of something. I nearly fainted from fear! Three people along the parade route fainted from the heat.
See also: faint

Faint heart never won fair lady.

Prov. A timid suitor never won his lady. (Used to encourage boys or men to be bold in courting women.) Bill: I'd really like to go out with Alice, but what if she says no? Alan: You won't know till you ask her. Faint heart never won fair lady. Don't be so shy about talking to Edith. Faint heart never won fair lady.
See also: faint, fair, heart, lady, never, won

faint of heart

Fig. people who are squeamish; someone who is sickened or disturbed by unpleasantness or challenge. The pathway around the top of the volcano, near the crater, is not for the faint of heart.
See also: faint, heart, of

damn with faint praise

Compliment so feebly that it amounts to no compliment at all, or even implies condemnation. For example, The reviewer damned the singer with faint praise, admiring her dress but not mentioning her voice . This idea was already expressed in Roman times by Favorinus (c. a.d. 110) but the actual expression comes from Alexander Pope's Epistle to Doctor Arbuthnot (1733): "Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, and, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer."
See also: damn, faint, praise

damn someone/something with faint praise

If you damn someone or something with faint praise, you praise them, but in such a weak way that it is obvious that you do not really have a high opinion of them. In recent months he has consistently damned the government with faint praise. Note: People occasionally use by instead of with. He has been damned by faint praise throughout his career even though he has scored all manner of important goals. Note: You can also just talk about faint praise. Mr Robinson called him `the most obvious candidate'. That sounds like faint praise. Note: This expression was first used by the English writer Alexander Pope in his `Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot' (1735): `Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer.'

damn someone or something with faint praise

praise someone or something so unenthusiastically as to imply condemnation.
This expression comes from the poet Alexander Pope's ‘Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ ( 1735 ): ‘Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer’.
1994 Canadian Defence Quarterly True there is the occasional condescending nod to those who served, but this frequently amounts to damning with faint praise.

a faint heart

timidity or lack of willpower preventing you from achieving your objective.
Faint heart never won fair lady is a proverb which dates in this wording from the early 17th century; the idea, however, was around at least two centuries earlier.
See also: faint, heart

not have the faintest (idea)

have no idea. informal
See also: faint, have, not

damn somebody/something with faint ˈpraise

praise somebody/something so little that you seem to be criticizing them/it: All he said was that I was ‘capable’. Talk about damning someone with faint praise!

not have the ˈfaintest/ˈfoggiest (idea)

(British English, informal) have no idea at all about something; not know anything at all: I haven’t got the faintest idea what to buy Roger for his birthday.‘Where are we?’ ‘I’m afraid I haven’t the foggiest.’
See also: faint, foggy, have, not
References in periodicals archive ?
Work on display is by Jim Biddulph, Alejandro Clavo, Charlene Clempson, Katie Shipley, Patricia Shrigley, Charlotte Young and Garth Gratix, whose project, Have Art Will Travel, exhibited in Liverpool's Travelodge during the Biennial, continues in Faintly Drawn Lines.
In an increasingly globalised, on-demand world, local nuance is gradually being flattened out or eroded and any suggestion of modifying behaviour to suit climate is seen as faintly risible (the Mediterranean siesta is now under increasing threat, for instance).
Yet if, for some reason, he is unable to take up the post, wouldn't it be faintly ridiculous if we ruled out the next best man purely on the grounds of his nationality?
Still, there was a sense of mild disappointment, faintly detectable under the composed party-smiles of the magazine's staff, that no one more interesting had turned up.
The result, a virtual model of his own body, is Dupont's raw material, but the two-foot-tall figures in this exhibition have been put through further paces: They are variously widened, attenuated, or pulled along a diagonal axis so that one edge of the body seems to advance, dragging the rest behind it (and, in so doing, faintly echoes Marcel Duchamp's Nude Descending a Staircase, 1912).
As we strained our ears, we could hear it faintly ringing behind the retaining wall.
We know this because, even when perfectly edge-on, they are faintly visible from Earth.
Not 20 feet up, even acrophobes turn believers: Sun warms the skin, insects buzz faintly, and it smells like Christmas.
But to email protection experts, a zombie network is nothing even faintly amusing: it's one of the latest and most threatening ways of corrupting corporate networks.
He brushes very faintly his idea of Baptist particularity (missionary urgency and believer's baptism), but moves to what Baptists have in common with ,other Christians.
In the last scene, Emily stands alone in a studio, singing over music that plays faintly in the background.
On the north side of Nehalem Street, a single window glowed faintly golden in the barn-like wall of St.
Coast Guard" appears faintly above the hangar door as a reminder of times past.
The tests did better when they were read after 10 minutes and when questionable results were included, but only at the extended reading time did all 18 brands at least faintly detect the highest hCG level.
In an age of suicide jets and anthrax spam," writes Beato, "obscenity cases feel faintly anachronistic, the comfort crimes of the legal system.