faint

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Related to fainting: Fainting goats

be not for the faint-hearted

To be unsuitable for those who are easily stressed or frightened. That horror movie is definitely not for the faint-hearted. I don't scare easily, and I screamed the whole time! Working in an operating room is not for the faint-hearted.
See also: not

not have the faintest idea

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. I do not have the faintest idea where I left my car keys. He does not have the faintest idea how hard it is to run a business.
See also: faint, have, idea, not

damn (someone or something) with faint praise

To criticize or undermine someone or something by showing a lack of enthusiasm. I needed you to support me in there! The committee probably won't approve of my research project now that you've damned it with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

not have the foggiest (notion)

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. He doesn't have the foggiest notion how hard it is to run a business. A: "Do you know where the car keys are?" B: "I haven't the foggiest. Sorry."
See also: foggy, have, not

not have the faintest (notion)

To have no knowledge or understanding about something. He doesn't have the faintest notion how hard it is to run a business. A: "Do you know where the car keys are?" B: "I haven't the faintest, sorry."
See also: faint, have, not

damn someone or something with faint praise

Fig. to criticize someone or something indirectly by not praising enthusiastically. The critic did not say that he disliked the play, but he damned it with faint praise. Mrs. Brown is very proud of her son's achievements, but damns her daughter's with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

faint dead away

Fig. to faint and fall unconscious. I almost fainted dead away. David will faint dead away when he reads this.
See also: away, dead, faint

faint from something

to faint because of something. I nearly fainted from fear! Three people along the parade route fainted from the heat.
See also: faint

Faint heart never won fair lady.

Prov. A timid suitor never won his lady. (Used to encourage boys or men to be bold in courting women.) Bill: I'd really like to go out with Alice, but what if she says no? Alan: You won't know till you ask her. Faint heart never won fair lady. Don't be so shy about talking to Edith. Faint heart never won fair lady.
See also: faint, fair, heart, lady, never, won

faint of heart

Fig. people who are squeamish; someone who is sickened or disturbed by unpleasantness or challenge. The pathway around the top of the volcano, near the crater, is not for the faint of heart.
See also: faint, heart, of

damn with faint praise

Compliment so feebly that it amounts to no compliment at all, or even implies condemnation. For example, The reviewer damned the singer with faint praise, admiring her dress but not mentioning her voice . This idea was already expressed in Roman times by Favorinus (c. a.d. 110) but the actual expression comes from Alexander Pope's Epistle to Doctor Arbuthnot (1733): "Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, and, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer."
See also: damn, faint, praise

damn someone/something with faint praise

If you damn someone or something with faint praise, you praise them, but in such a weak way that it is obvious that you do not really have a high opinion of them. In recent months he has consistently damned the government with faint praise. Note: People occasionally use by instead of with. He has been damned by faint praise throughout his career even though he has scored all manner of important goals. Note: You can also just talk about faint praise. Mr Robinson called him `the most obvious candidate'. That sounds like faint praise. Note: This expression was first used by the English writer Alexander Pope in his `Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot' (1735): `Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer.'

damn someone or something with faint praise

praise someone or something so unenthusiastically as to imply condemnation.
This expression comes from the poet Alexander Pope's ‘Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ ( 1735 ): ‘Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer’.
1994 Canadian Defence Quarterly True there is the occasional condescending nod to those who served, but this frequently amounts to damning with faint praise.

a faint heart

timidity or lack of willpower preventing you from achieving your objective.
Faint heart never won fair lady is a proverb which dates in this wording from the early 17th century; the idea, however, was around at least two centuries earlier.
See also: faint, heart

not have the faintest (idea)

have no idea. informal
See also: faint, have, not

damn somebody/something with faint ˈpraise

praise somebody/something so little that you seem to be criticizing them/it: All he said was that I was ‘capable’. Talk about damning someone with faint praise!

not have the ˈfaintest/ˈfoggiest (idea)

(British English, informal) have no idea at all about something; not know anything at all: I haven’t got the faintest idea what to buy Roger for his birthday.‘Where are we?’ ‘I’m afraid I haven’t the foggiest.’
See also: faint, foggy, have, not
References in periodicals archive ?
With the feet resting on a footpad, the patient then stays in this nearly upright position for 20 to 45 minutes, he explained, adding that the procedure mimics the drop in blood pressure that occurs prior to fainting.
This, combined with her low blood pressure, means that at times Tessa's body virtually shuts down, causing a fainting spell.
He is so used to associating a fainting fit with stress that it has become almost a habit, explained leading expert Rev Dr Geoff Scobie.
Fainting attacks are normally short, but if you're unconscious for more than one or two minutes without any signs of regaining consciousness, additional first aid may be needed and they should call for help.
People who suffer from mysterious fainting episodes often live in fear, and the time and testing efforts by physicians to help identify a diagnosis consume considerable healthcare resources," said Andrew Krahn, M.
Unexplained fainting (syncope) is a major diagnostic challenge for physicians and a widespread medical concern, accounting for over a million physician visits and more than 170,000 hospitalizations annually.
In a test of 20 people prone to fainting, Dutch researchers found the manoeuvre gave all the sufferers enough time to sit or lie down - crucial in avoiding injury.
The most common cause of fainting is standing still for too long, particularly in a hot atmosphere.
Researchers are finding that, in some cases, fainting episodes also may be indicative of a PE.
Health Minister Mam Bun Heng yesterday announced the formation of a working group to address mass fainting, a day after the premier raised the issue at a meeting with garment workers, though relevant officials had few details on the group's objectives.
A: Fainting, which your veterinarian will call "syncope," is a temporary loss of consciousness followed by a spontaneous rapid recovery.
The reasoning for her fainting spell has not been confirmed at this time, according to the New York Post.
This is known as a vasovagal response and often causes fainting.
Fainting occurs when the blood supply to your brain is momentarily inadequate causing you to lose consciousness.
A 17-year-old schoolgirl from Athienou is in intensive care at Nicosia General Hospital with a brain haemorrhage after fainting following a blood drive, falling on the ground and hitting her head outside her school in Larnaca on Tuesday.