fading


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Related to fading: Multipath fading

fade away

To slowly become less noticeable or significant. As the song faded away, the audience leapt to their feet and cheered for an encore. The line for the ride was so long that my excitement had completely faded away by the time we reached the front of it.
See also: away, fade

fade back

1. In American football, for an offensive player to move backward before making a play while the rest of the offensive players move forward. The quarterback faded back before throwing the ball.
2. To recede. I started to cry as I watched my old house fade back in the rearview mirror.
See also: back, fade

fade down

To gradually decrease in intensity, often of sound. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fade" and "down." Fade that song down, will you? I don't want it ending quite so abruptly.
See also: down, fade

fade from (something)

To gradually disappear from something. It took months, but the pain of that break-up has finally faded from my consciousness. I looked out the window and watched as the train station faded from view.
See also: fade

fade from view

To gradually disappear from sight. I looked out the window and watched as the train station faded from view.
See also: fade, view

fade in

To slowly begin to be seen or heard, as is commonly done during television shows, plays, and movies. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fade" and "in." Then let's fade in on the happy family having a meal together.
See also: fade

fade into (something)

To slowly transition from one thing to another. The golden hues of sunlight faded into pink as the sun began to set.
See also: fade

fade into insignificance

To begin to seem unimportant when compared to something else. My good grades faded into insignificance once my sister got home with news that she would be the lead in the school play.
See also: fade, insignificance

fade into the woodwork

To make oneself inconspicuous. Because I'm on probation, I'm just trying to fade into the woodwork for now.
See also: fade, woodwork

fade out

1. verb To slowly stop being seen or heard. And then we'll fade out, and the credits will start to roll.
2. verb To cause something to slowly stop being seen or heard. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "fade" and "out." Fade that scene out and then roll the credits.
3. noun The act of slowly ceasing to be seen or heard. When used as a noun, the phrase is usually written as one word. The fadeout on that song needs to be less abrupt.
See also: fade, out

fade up

1. To slowly become more forceful or powerful. Make sure the guitars fade up during the first verse.
2. To slowly cause something to become more forceful or powerful. The sound engineer faded the guitars up during the first verse.
See also: fade, up

fade away

 (into something)
1. . to diminish into something. The light faded away into nothing. The sound of the drums faded away into the distance.
2. Go to fade out.
See also: away, fade

fade back (into something)

to move back into a particular area. He faded back to throw a pass. Quickly and unnoticed, he faded back.
See also: back, fade

fade down

[for sound] to diminish. The roar of the train faded down as it passed and fled into the night. As the thunder faded down, the sun began to break through the clouds.
See also: down, fade

fade from view

[for a sight] to fade away, typically owing to loss of light or distance. The scene faded from view as the stage lights dimmed. My house faded from view as we drove down the long road to town.
See also: fade, view

fade out

 and fade away
to diminish and go away altogether. The light in the distance faded out as the sun began to set. The light faded out as the candles burned themselves out, one by one. As it got farther into the distance, the car faded away.
See also: fade, out

fade something down

to turn down a sound. (Broadcasting.) The radio engineer faded the music down and the announcer's voice began. She faded down the music.
See also: down, fade

fade something in

to bring a picture, sound, or both into prominence. (Broadcasting.) The technician faded the picture in and the program began. Fade in the picture a little faster next time.
See also: fade

fade something out

to diminish something altogether. (Broadcasting.) At the end, you should fade the music out completely. Fade out the music earlier.
See also: fade, out

fade something up

to increase the sound gradually. (Broadcasting.) The director faded the music up and then down again before the announcer spoke. Fade up the music when the announcer stops talking.
See also: fade, up

fade out

1. Gradually disappear or become inaudible; also, cause to disappear or become inaudible gradually. For example, He let the final chord fade out completely before he played the next movement. The antonym is fade in, "to appear gradually or become audible," as in The images on the screen faded in until they could be seen clearly. These terms originated in the motion-picture and broadcasting industries, where they apply to images and sounds. [c. 1915]
2. Also, fade away. Quietly depart, as in "Florence Scape, Fanny Scape and their mother faded away to Boulogne" (William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, 1848). [Mid-1800s]
See also: fade, out

fade away

v.
To dissipate or fade slowly and completely: As I got older, my memories faded away.
See also: away, fade

fade back

v.
1. In American football, to move away from the line of scrimmage, opposite to the direction of the overall offensive play, in order to gain time to make a forward pass: The quarterback faded back and looked downfield for an open receiver.
2. To move something backwards into some space: After she took the medicine, the rash faded back to just her finger.
See also: back, fade

fade in

v.
To cause something, especially sound, light, or a cinematic or television image, to appear or be heard gradually: At the beginning of the play, a voice mutters quietly as the lights fade in.
See also: fade

fade out

v.
1. To disappear gradually: The final scene of the movie faded out.
2. To cause something, especially a sound or a cinematic or television image, to disappear gradually: The technician will fade out the lights when the speaker gets off the stage. I faded the spotlight out at the end of the act.
See also: fade, out

fade up

v.
1. To increase in intensity: The sound of the drums fades up as the piece begins.
2. To cause something to increase in intensity: The director said we should fade the lights up on the back of the stage. The picture faded up as the movie began.
See also: fade, up
References in periodicals archive ?
To the best of our knowledge, the effects of the no wireless radio fading models other than the Rayleigh distribution have been considered in the performance of the adaptive networks [1]-[4], while it is a very important issue.
Develi, "Performance of two-hop DS-CDMA systems using amplify-and-forward protocol over different fading channels", Elektronika ir Elektrotechnika, vol 22, no 1, pp.
Section 4 studies the fading effects on carrier sensing considering the interplay with interference.
Assuming independent branch signals and equal average received SNR, the pdf of the received SNR at the output of dual-branch SC under Nakagami-m fading channels is given by [19]-[20] is
In figure 1 the influence of fading parameter [eta] on the performance of the receiver with an imperfect reference carrier extraction can be traced for the case of QPSK detection.
Assuming that both the average signal and noise powers are unity, then the SNR will be equal to the squared fading channel amplitude i.e.
Fading is a problem for any building manager concerned about damage to furniture, window treatments, and carpets and can be especially problematic in retail establishments.
A painted sign has a realistic life of 15 years before fading is noticeable.
While Fading Days is solid, it might also be slightly forgettable.
Michels addressed in "Fading of Grain Refinement in Permanent Mold Cast Copper Alloys" (04-112) how grain refinement, or fading, occurs in several materials, such as yellow brasses and silicon bronzes, but at different time lengths.
A: If the ink is made with methyl violet pigment, it will experience fading when exposed to light.
But rather than scold Simon Peter and us, it occurs to me that, regardless of whether Moses really used the veil to hide the fading of his facial glow, Paul is correct.
FADING AWAY: Henry Peach Robinson, Phil Sayers & Rikke Lundgreen.