factor

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factor in

To incorporate or involve something in something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "factor" and "in." Before you accept this job offer, you need to factor in how long the commute is.
See also: factor

factor out

1. To exclude something or keep it from being incorporated into something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "factor" and "out." Before you accept this job offer, you need to factor out everyone else's opinions and think about what you really want.
2. In mathematics, to change an equation so that something (such as a variable) used multiple times is instead used once. A noun or pronoun can be used between "factor" and "out." OK, what do we need to factor out in order solve this equation?
See also: factor, out

fudge factor

Room for error or mistakes. I'm not very good at math, so I always leave a fudge factor when I'm tallying up my expenditures for the month.
See also: factor, fudge

gut factor

The subjective, emotional element or dimension that influences a decision. All three candidates appear ideal for the position, so we'll have to rely on the gut factor when we make our choice.
See also: factor, gut

serve as the driving force (behind someone or something)

To act as the instigator, catalyst, or motivator that compels someone to do something or causes something to happen. While they haven't admitted why they reversed their decision, everyone knows the lawsuit served as the driving factor. The willingness of the banks to let anyone and everyone get a mortgage, whether or not they would be able to meet their repayments, served as the single biggest driving factor behind the financial crisis. My family has always served as the driving factor behind me.
See also: driving, force, serve, someone

sleaze factor

An aspect, element, or part of a group, organization, campaign, activity, etc., that engages in, is tainted by, or is known for immoral, corrupt, or scandalous behavior. We're aiming to create a dating website for professional adults, without the sleaze factor for which some of our competitors are known. The deregulation of this industry has caused the sleaze factor to skyrocket, as people motivated purely by greed now have myriad ways to manipulate the system.
See also: factor, sleaze

x factor

A unique and noteworthy quality that makes someone or something exceptional. There are a lot of really talented singers in this contest, but I think Molly's x factor is her stage presence. A lot of similar products are on the market right now—ours has to have an X factor!
See also: factor

fudge factor

Fig. a margin of error. I never use a fudge factor. I measure correctly, and I cut the material exactly the way I measured it. I built in a fudge factor of three percent.
See also: factor, fudge

factor in

Figure in, include as a basic element. For example, In preparing the schedule we factored in vacation and sick days. This term comes from mathematics. [Mid-1900s]
See also: factor

sleaze factor

The element in a political party, administration, or other organization that is corrupt, controversial, or tainted by scandal. For example, I can't see myself making a campaign contribution to them-there's too much of a sleaze factor . This slangy expression derives from the adjective sleazy, which means "vulgar" or "tawdry." The idiom was first used in politics in the 1980s.
See also: factor, sleaze

fudge factor

a figure which is included in a calculation in order to account for some unquantified but significant phenomenon or to ensure a desired result.
Fudge, apparently originating in the mid 18th century as an exclamation of disgust or irritation, later acquired a specific verbal sense in printers' jargon, meaning to ‘do work imperfectly or as best you can with the materials available’.
See also: factor, fudge

factor in

v.
1. To take something into account; take something into consideration; figure something in: We factored sick days and vacations in when we prepared the work schedule. The boss factored in overtime when giving out bonuses.
2. To be taken into account or consideration; to be figured in: These observations are interesting, but they don't really factor in.
See also: factor

factor out

v.
1. To reanalyze a situation or problem in order to remove something from consideration: If we factor out personal details, it seems that everyone has the same story. If we factor the bad data out, the results are predictable.
2. Mathematics To rewrite an expression so that something, especially a constant or variable, appearing more than once in the expression appears only once: By factoring the shared terms out of the expression, we can easily solve the equation. The teacher factored out 3x from both sides of the equation 6x^3 + 9x^2 + 12x = 24x.
See also: factor, out

fudge factor

n. a margin of error. I never use a fudge factor. I measure correctly, and I cut the material exactly the way I measured it.
See also: factor, fudge

sleaze factor

The part of a situation or organization that is sordid or corrupt. The word sleaze has been used in the sense of immoral or corrupt since about 1960. The entire phrase is used mostly for components of an administration, political party, or campaign. An article by Joshua E. Keating was headlined, “Sleaze Factor, Is There an Epidemic of Corruption in the World’s Democracies?” (Foreign Policy, July 12, 2010). An article about a television reality show was headlined, “Critics Blame Big Media for Sleaze Factor” (Frank Ahrens, Washington Post, February 11, 2004).
See also: factor, sleaze
References in periodicals archive ?
It shows that ,,the factoring is the operation whereby the client called ,,adherent" transferring ownership of receivables (bills) to its commercial bank, called ,,factor", which has an obligation, under contract, to ensure recovery of receivables of the adherent, assuming their risk of default".
Given the general reluctance of banks to lend to SMEs in today's environment unless there is relative strong security, like real estate or a personal guarantee, factoring may also be a way for a business to be self-standing in its financing, without resorting to collateral or guarantees.
Mulroy explained that the factoring fee usually fell between 1 to 2 percent of the invoice value of goods traded.
By factoring, the companies engaged in commercial transactions also benefit by the fact that they can concentrate on developing the business by expanding production and sales, while the Factor is in charge with monitoring the cashing of bills and recording the collection of the factoring bills (Vartolomei, 2006).
Most of the new owners of small business factoring companies came from the lending arena, so they concentrate on this side of the business while only providing minimal credit and collection services.
* The market for factoring services was dominated primarily by textile wholesalers and manufacturers.
"In factoring, however, it's not appropriate to annualize it out and say you're paying more than 36% a year [with a 3% fee]," says Craig Sheinker, president of Quantum; "because we don't require the client to use us any more than he needs us.
Last June, Carissan's remarkable factoring machine found a new home at the Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers in Paris.
Finance charges for factoring can range from as little as 2.5% to as high as 15%, according to Marvin Waldman, president of the Caramon Group in Fairhill, Maryland.
Meanwhile, mathematicians developed a version of the number field sieve that can be used for factoring any composite number.
At that time, Rivest predicted that factoring this number, using the fastest computers and best factoring methods then available, would require considerably more than 40 quadrillion years of computation.
Companies typically known for using factoring have been in the textile and apparel industries.
Two computer scientists have reached an important milestone on the road toward factoring ever-larger composite numbers.
(Red) Alford of the University of Georgia in Athens finished factoring a 95-digit number.
"This represents the 4-minute mile of factoring," says mathematician Ronald L.