fact of life


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fact of life

Something unpleasant that must be accepted because it cannot be changed. Gloomy, rainy days are just a fact of life for the British. Death is a fact of life.
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facts of life

Knowledge of sexual reproduction, as in Some people feel that the facts of life should not be taught in school. [Late 1800s] Also see birds and the bees.
See also: fact, life, of

a fact of life

COMMON If you say that something is a fact of life, you mean that it is something that often happens and cannot be avoided, even if it is unpleasant. It is a fact of life that parents want their children to marry and have their own children. Falling prices have been a fact of life in the housing market.
See also: fact, life, of

a fact of life

something that must be accepted and cannot be changed, however unpalatable.
See also: fact, life, of

a ˌfact of ˈlife

something difficult or unpleasant that cannot be changed and has to be accepted or dealt with: Taxes are a fact of life. You just have to pay them.It is a fact of life that some people are born more intelligent than others.
See also: fact, life, of

facts of life

1. n. an explanation of human reproduction, especially as presented to a child. No one ever explained the facts of life to me. I read books about it.
2. n. the truth about life’s difficulties. You had better face up to the facts of life and get a job.
See also: fact, life, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Another sad fact of life is that there are more impersonators of the King in his fat, tight-fitting-jumpsuit days than in his prime, when he made all those films with no plot lines.
Paul Hamblin, CPRE's head of transport policy, said: "So often you hear that car use is a fact of life in the countryside.
Injuries are a fact of life. Yet the culture often makes you feel guilty, as if you're somehow to blame, while leaving you out in the cold.
White-Collar redundancy has become such a fact of life over this decade that it has lost much of its sting.
In an initial analysis of results, the McKinlays report that depression in menopausal women, long regarded as a fact of life, is due not to the physiological change but to other causes.
IT'S a sad fact of life today that nothing is sacred.
The Asset Covered Security Bill 2001 has the aim of allowing Irish financial institutions to compete more effectively against European competition after the euro currency becomes a fact of life in Ireland at the start of 2002 - just a few weeks away.
"Separation was a fact of life but always very difficult, " he said in an interview marking his departure from the Royal Navy after 22 years.
Creating an even floor was the lesser task, but locating a suitable and durable floor still eludes producer Rebecca Weller, who finds patching its current polypropylene surface a fact of life.
Competition is a fact of life in business, especially in the fast pace of change driven by today's technological advances.
"DNA damage is an ongoing fact of life,' Pryor says.
Late-night shopping is a fact of life in many European cities and across North America, but in Cardiff the shutters go up early, apart from on a Thursday and in the run-up to Christmas.
Attempting to enforce such a mandate would create a political environment not unlike Prohibition, where violations would become second nature and an accepted fact of life.
"Competition is a fact of life in dance," says Linda Hamilton, a clinical psychologist with a practice that focuses on performers.
It's a harsh fact of life that I'm keeping a shirt warm for a British Lion."