facing


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put (one) through (one's) facings

To force one to demonstrate one's skill in a particular area, usually in a grueling manner. Boy, they really put me through my facings at that job interview today—I had to give a mock lecture to a whole team of people! If my son wants a promotion, I'm going to put him through his facings so that he truly earns it.
See also: facing, put, through

face the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to face the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will face the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, face

face the music

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to face the music. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will face the music in the future.
See also: face, music

face down

1. verb To confront or intimidate someone until they relent. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "face" and "down." I'm so impressed that that scrawny little kid faced the bully down!
2. verb To turn something so that the top or printed side cannot be seen. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "face" and "down. Be sure to face your tests down when you're done.
3. adjective (of a person) Lying on one's stomach. Just lie face down on the table and the masseuse will be in with you shortly.
4. adjective (of a thing) With the top or printed side turned down so that it cannot be seen. Put your test face down on the desk when you're done.
See also: down, face

face off

1. verb To begin a competition or contest. If you make it to the finals, you'll have to face off against their best player.
2. verb To initiate a competition or contest between two people. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "face" and "off." The referees will face you two off before the match begins.
3. verb In certain sports (like ice hockey), to begin play by dropping the ball or puck between two opponents. Send your best center out there to face off against theirs.
4. noun A conflict or confrontation. The phrase is typically hyphenated when used as a noun. A: "How long were those two in a face-off before the teacher got there?" B: "Long enough for Joey to give Pete a black eye!"
5. noun In hockey, when the puck is dropped between two opposing players to begin play, either at the start of the game or after a stoppage. The phrase is typically hyphenated when used as a noun. Our center won the face-off and passed the puck up the ice.
See also: face, off

face out

1. verb To address someone or something directly, often in an unpleasant situation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "face" and "out." If you want to finally resolve the tension, you should face out your mom instead of avoiding her.
2. adjective To be turned in a particular direction, typically so that something is visible. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "face" and "out." I want the labels on all of the bottles to face out so that people can see what their drink options are.
3. adjective With the top or printed side turned up so that it can be seen. When you're done, please flip your test over so that the answers don't face out.
See also: face, out

face up

1. verb To turn something so that the top or printed side can be seen. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "face" and "up." Face your projects up, and I will come around and collect them.
2. verb To deal with or tackle something that is troublesome and/or causes one trepidation. Just face up to your role in the situation—I'm sure Maggie will forgive you if you're honest with her.
3. adjective (of a person) Lying on one's stomach. I just can't sleep on my stomach—I have to lie on my back.
4. adjective (of a thing) With the top or printed side turned up so that it cannot be seen. Put your projects face up on your desks, and I will come around and collect them.
See also: face, up

face up to (something)

To deal with or tackle something that is troublesome and/or causes one trepidation. Just face up to your role in the situation—I'm sure Maggie will forgive you if you're honest with her.
See also: face, up

face off

 
1. . to begin a hockey game with two players facing one another. They faced off and the match was on.
2. to prepare for a confrontation. The opposing candidates faced off and the debate began. They faced off and I knew there was going to be a fight.
See also: face, off

face someone down

to make a face-to-face stand with someone who eventually backs down. Chuck succeeded in facing Tom down. Facing down Tom wasn't difficult for Chuck.
See also: down, face

face something down

to turn something face downward. Ted drew a card and faced it down. Face your cards down when you leave the card table.
See also: down, face

face the music

Fig. to receive punishment; to accept the unpleasant results of one's actions. Mary broke a dining-room window and had to face the music when her father got home. After failing a math test, Tom had to go home and face the music.
See also: face, music

face up (to someone or something)

to confront with courage someone or something representing a threat or unpleasantness. You are simply going to have to admit your mistake and face up to the boss. You must face up to the authorities if you have done something wrong.
See also: face, up

face down

1. With the upper surface put down, as in Please put these papers face down. This usage appears to come from cardplaying. [First half of 1600s] The antonym, "with the upper surface uppermost," is face up.
2. Overcome, intimidate, or browbeat someone in a bold confrontation. This verbal expression dates from the 16th century. Shakespeare used it in The Comedy of Errors (3:1): "Here's a villain that would face me down."
See also: down, face

face the music

Confront unpleasantness, especially the consequences of one's errors. For example, When the check bounced, he had to face the music. The precise allusion in this expression has been lost. Most authorities believe it refers to a theater's pit orchestra, which an actor must face when he faces what can be a hostile audience, but some hold it comes from the military, where a formal dismissal in disgrace would be accompanied by band music. [Second half of 1800s] Also see face up to.
See also: face, music

face up

see under face down.
See also: face, up

face the music

COMMON If you face the music, you accept responsibility for something that you have done wrong and you prepare yourself to be criticized or punished for it. We were foreigners in a forbidden area, the authorities had found out and we were about to face the music. Sooner or later, she'll have to face the music and it won't be pleasant. Note: The `music' in this expression may refer to the orchestra at an opera or musical. The orchestra sits in front of the stage, so when a performer faces the audience, they also face the orchestra, or `music'. Alternatively, the expression may come from an army practice in which a soldier who had been dismissed for dishonourable behaviour was sent away with drums beating.
See also: face, music

face the music

be confronted with the unpleasant consequences of your actions.
See also: face, music

face the ˈmusic

(informal) accept the difficulties, criticism and unpleasant results that your words or actions may cause: He’s been cheating us out of our money for years and now it’s time for him to face the music.
See also: face, music

face down

v.
1. To confront someone in a resolute or determined manner: The incumbent faced down the opponent in a debate. The soldiers faced the enemy down.
2. To position something so that its front surface is oriented downward: I faced the picture down so that I wouldn't be reminded of my dead parents.
See also: down, face

face off

v.
1. To begin a confrontation or competition: The troublemakers had just faced off when the playground aide noticed them.
2. To begin to confront or compete with someone: Those in favor of the proposal faced off with their opponents yesterday. The incumbent faced off against the challenger in a televised debate.
3. To cause something or someone to begin a confrontation or competition with or against something or someone: The organizers faced the finalists off against each other. The organizers faced each finalist off with the other. The organizers faced these two teams off early in the competition.
4. Sports To start play in ice hockey, lacrosse, and similar games by releasing the puck or ball between two opposing players: In hockey, the teams face off at the start of each period.
See also: face, off

face out

v.
1. To be placed so that a front surface shows: The paintings on the wall face out.
2. To place something so that its front surface is exposed: Keep the two parts of the sign folded together while it's raining, but face them out so we can read them when the rain stops. The window dresser faced the mannequins out so that passersby could see the clothing.
3. To confront directly and engage with someone or something, often to resolve or get through a conflict or a problem: Don't be afraid of them; you should face them out and defend yourself. I faced out my fear of flying and walked on the plane.
See also: face, out

face up

v.
1. To position something so that its front surface is oriented upward: The designer faced the mirror up to reflect the sunlight.
2. face up to To confront an unpleasant situation; accept responsibility, blame, or a particular reality: The manager finally faced up to the problem of theft.
See also: face, up

face the music

tv. to receive the rebuke that is due one. (see also chinmusic.) You have to face the music eventually.
See also: face, music

face the music

To accept the unpleasant consequences, especially of one's own actions.
See also: face, music
References in periodicals archive ?
In Asia, the Company has signed a definitive agreement to acquire for US$25 million a 50% equity interest in a state of the art wood composite molded door facing manufacturing facility from a subsidiary of Samling Strategic Corporation.
The Company estimates that approximately 66 million interior doors are sold in Asia annually, of which fewer than 10% are currently manufactured with wood composite molded door facings.
Masonite holds the unique, global position of manufacturing wood composite molded door facings in North America, South America, Europe and Asia.
Paul DesignPoint(SM) provides protection for companies facing voluntary recalls as well as recalls that are government-mandated.
Paul DesignPoint(SM) also provides specific protection for manufacturers facing losses related to the defect, design or installation of their products.
BUSINESS WIRE)--March 22, 1999--Concur Technologies (Nasdaq:CNQR), a leading provider of Intranet-based employee facing business applications, today announced the general availability of Employee Desktop(tm) 5.
With our employee facing applications, companies can realize dramatic process efficiencies, cost savings, and increased employee productivity, that directly impact their bottom-line.