extreme

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boring in the extreme

Extremely boring. That film was boring in the extreme—it actually put me to sleep in the theater!
See also: boring, extreme

carry (something) to extremes

To do something in an excessive or overzealous manner. With the way Phil keeps bossing us around, he's really carrying his title of "interim manager" to extremes.
See also: carry, extreme, to

go from one extreme to another

To change or shift between two very different states or things. A: "Why's Mom so upset? I thought she was happy that I moved out." B: "Yeah, well, you know Mom—she tends to go from one extreme to another." Snow one day and 60 degree sunshine the next? Boy, the weather around here sure can go from one extreme to another!
See also: another, extreme, go, one, to

go from one extreme to the other

To change or shift between two very different states or things. A: "Why's Mom so upset? I thought she was happy that I moved out." B: "Yeah, well, you know Mom—she tends to go from one extreme to the other." Snow one day and 60 degree sunshine the next? Boy, the weather around here sure can go from one extreme to the other!
See also: extreme, go, one, other, to

go to extremes

1. To take drastic measures toward some goal or end. I'm not surprised that he rigged the student council election—he seems like the type to go to extremes to get what he wants.
2. To act in an excessive or overzealous manner. Don't go to extremes scouring your whole house for my charging cord—just let me know if you happen to see it.
See also: extreme, go, to

in the extreme

To the furthest extent or degree. Geez, that film was boring in the extreme—it actually put me to sleep in the theater! I thought that movie was silly in the extreme, but the kids loved it.
See also: extreme

kill (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be killed with extreme prejudice. We must kill these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.
See also: extreme, kill, prejudice

silly in the extreme

Extremely silly. I thought that movie was silly in the extreme, but the kids loved it.
See also: extreme, silly

take (something) to extremes

To do something in an excessive or overzealous manner. With the way Phil keeps bossing us around, he's really taking his title of "interim manager" to extremes.
See also: extreme, take, to

terminate (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be terminated with extreme prejudice. We must terminate these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go from one extreme to the other

to change from one thing to its opposite. You go from one extreme to another about Tom—one day angry, the next day perfectly happy.
See also: extreme, go, one, other, to

go to extremes (to do something)

to be excessive in one's efforts to do something. Auntie Jane will go to extremes to make us all comfortable. Let's not go to extremes! We've already spent enough on gifts for the kids.
See also: extreme, go, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

terminate someone with extreme prejudice

murder or assassinate someone. euphemistic, chiefly US
The expression originated in the terminology of the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1970s.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

boring, silly, etc. in the exˈtreme

extremely boring, silly, etc: I must admit, it’s puzzling in the extreme just how these books found their way here.
See also: extreme

go to exˈtremes

,

carry/take something to exˈtremes

behave in a way that is not moderate or normal: She really goes to extremes, spending such huge sums of money on entertaining her friends.You never go out after dark? That’s taking being careful to extremes, isn’t it?
See also: extreme, go, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in the extreme

To an extreme degree: eccentric in the extreme.
See also: extreme
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And moderation might be enough to satisfy the public appetite for condemnation given the phenomenon of extremeness aversion.
Second, courts should focus on the extremeness of a redistricting's partisan effects primarily as a proxy for partisan purpose, rather than a measure of the substantive harm itself.
Morality (or, Virtue) * Broad-range product improvement * Constructive stakeholder management Intellectual (or, Wisdom) * 'Holding the opportunity' * Extreme customer-orientation--'Just for fans; crush of fans' * Internet philosophy: focus, extremeness, reputation, and speed * Global vision Physical Ability (or, * Invention vs.
Psychopaths have been shown to have incredibly high rates of recidivism, which strongly correlates with the extremeness of the cluster of psychopathy symptoms.
See also Itamar Simonson & Amos Tversky, Choice in Context: Tradeoff Contrast and Extremeness Aversion, 29 J.
Such is the extremeness and eccentricity of those to whom Romney must appeal for votes and cash.
Because of the extremeness of the problem, the goal of "general welfare" was an appropriate federal area in which to legislate.
I do understand it but it is taken to extremeness," Ramos added.
In addition, the extremeness of the climate in Antarctica is not a welcoming place for mankind.
This can be explained in part by aversion to "extremeness":
Third, "the extremeness aversion" is the tendency to avoid options that appear to be at the extreme point of some relevant continuum (Benartzi and Thaler 2002).
Both the extremeness of revulsion and the gush of personal memories indicate that a nerve has been struck: "It was the soft, amiable Negro voice, like those I remembered from early childhood, with the note of docile subservience in it.
But when life is understood in its irreducible complexity, as a multidimensional phenomenon which is, so to speak, always beyond itself; when it is considered in its depth, stratification, and discontinuity, in the richness of its phenomena, in the diversity of its manifestations, in the extremeness of its transformations, the scenario changes.
(2) These statistics included the Pearson and deviance residuals, hat matrix diagonal (measure of observation's extremeness), dfBeta (measures of influence on regression coefficients), C and CBar (analogous to Cook's D in linear regression), and delta deviance and delta chi-square.