extrapolate

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extrapolate (something) from (something)

To deduce information from something Yeah, I extrapolated that they broke up from the scene I walked in on—Lauren sitting in the dark and crying with no sign of her so-called boyfriend anywhere.
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extrapolate something from something

to reason out the answer from the known facts. I cannot extrapolate what he meant from these notes. Can you extrapolate the annual total from the company's sales so far this year?
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References in periodicals archive ?
By extrapolating the orbit into the future, the astronomers verified there's no chance of Hermes hitting Earth within the next 100 years, which is as long into the future as astronomers typically predict for asteroids.
The study not only provides information on the quantitative contribution of benzene to cancer deaths from cigarette smoking, it also helps demonstrate the validity of linear models in extrapolating to low doses of benzene.
Because a person's exposure to alpha particles typically is low, researchers have had to estimate public health threats from radon by extrapolating from the effects of higher doses of alpha radiation.
"We have always been careful when extrapolating from mice to humans.
Extrapolating from sexual rotifers, bdelloid specialist Bill Birky at the University (If Arizona in Tucson speculates that males, if they existed, would be "small swimming hypodermic syringes full of sperm." He pictures them zooming up to females to inject sperm right through the body wall.
They, however, caution against extrapolating from the feeding habits of worms to complex human behavior.
In extrapolating their observations to ultraviolet light, the high-energy radiation that can create the imbalance, Bailey and his colleagues had to assume that its spectrum in the star-forming cloud was relatively narrow.
Extrapolating from the 5-year study, Mayeux estimates that women who take the drug for a decade reduce their odds of getting Alzheimer's by nearly 40 percent.
Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, warns against extrapolating from mice to humans.
Extrapolating from their observations, the team estimates that low-density hydrogen clouds could collectively contain as much mass as the known population of galaxies.
"Based on the amount of data we now have, extrapolating from the mouse model to the human model is titillating but dangerous," says study coauthor Michael Potter of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md.