extrapolate (something) from (something)

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extrapolate (something) from (something)

To deduce information from something Yeah, I extrapolated that they broke up from the scene I walked in on—Lauren sitting in the dark and crying with no sign of her so-called boyfriend anywhere.
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extrapolate something from something

to reason out the answer from the known facts. I cannot extrapolate what he meant from these notes. Can you extrapolate the annual total from the company's sales so far this year?
See also: extrapolate
References in periodicals archive ?
Extrapolated from the findings, the total number of objects between 10 and 100 m in diameter in the outer solar system could be as high as a quadrillion, notes astrophysicist Asantha Cooray of the University of California, Irvine, in a commentary accompanying the report.
ALA officials said the survey results, if extrapolated from the libraries that responded, would amount to a total of around 600 formal inquiries since 2001.
The team essentially tracked all children born to married couples after two censuses in the mid-1970s and early 1980s, comparing cancer cases with paternal occupational exposures extrapolated from census information.
Without seeking to recapture an imaginary original state, they simplified the plan by judicious demolition and, using stone so reclaimed, extrapolated from existing parts of the fabric to rebuild the plain stone facades, punctuating them with regular patterns of simple openings.
Data at 0 MPa for each temperature was extrapolated from the data using a 2nd degree polynomial.
To estimate the impact of the cloud on global climate, the researchers extrapolated from the known effects of smaller, more recent eruptions such as the 1815 Tambora eruption.
Choi emphasizes that the nifedipine dose needed to block calcium ions in the brain cells might be higher than the value he extrapolated from studies of peripheral nerves.
Risks now associated with low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation hae been extrapolated from effects seen in people exposed to high doses -- generally atomic-bomb survivors, recipients of early X-rays, or workers in uranium mines.