expropriate

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expropriate (something) from (someone or something)

To take or seize something from someone or something. This is our family's land—those greedy developers can't just expropriate it from us! My client is claiming that the defendant expropriated funds from her for his own campaign.
See also: expropriate
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

expropriate

something (from someone or something) (for someone or something) to seize something from someone or something for someone or something. The government expropriated the land from the peasants for an airfield. They expropriated land for a highway. They expropriated land from the farmers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While this is not precisely a valuation scheme that Dagan considers, the remedy suggests to future expropriators that they have little to fear from this method of restitution.
This newly-translated edition of Bayer's The Anarchist Expropriators is published by AK Press in collaboration with the Kate Sharpley Library and includes an introduction and timeline of events provided by the Kate Sharpley Library.
Allegedly, there are multiple mechanisms and fraudulent means which are used by the expropriators of land and resources from the scheduled areas.
Such Christian doctrine anticipates the views of Karl Marx, who in the mid-19th century predicted that, hopefully, the propertyless proletariat would "expropriate the expropriators."
We can already hear future echoes of Marx's critical remarks on the Paris Commune twenty-six years later, in which Marx defined the Commune as the 'expropriation of the expropriators'--a phrase that would reappear in the Part VIII of Volume One of Capital--aimed at the 'impossible communism' of 'transforming the means of production, land, and capital, now chiefly the means of enslaving and exploiting labor, into mere instruments of free and associated labor'--'impossible' because the capitalist ruling class were already actively incorporating 'co-operative production' for the purpose of 'continuing the present system'.
Armah's novels of liberation, like some of the world's oldest literature, are designed to speak of "revolutionary changes in social, economic and political structures in a language that is as unambiguous as, though more refinedly poetic than, Marx's explosively alliterative 'expropriation of the expropriators" (Armah 2007).
Mill, Marx's account of the dispossession of the peasantry, and his dream of "the expropriation of the expropriators," and the theories of imperialism of Joseph Chamberlain and Lenin.
In principle, you can articulate "freedom of speech" in a populist form as easily as "expropriation of the expropriators".
In an interview in 1970 she was more explicit in her own preference for private rather than capitalist or socialist ownership of property than she had been in The Human Condition: "Our problem today is not how to expropriate the expropriators, but, rather, how to arrange matters so that the masses, dispossessed by industrial society in capitalist and socialist systems, can regain property" (Crisis 175).
The article also sheds new light on some important events in Stalin's career, especially the circumstances surrounding his departure for Batumi in late 1901; on the question of which party committees he served on and when; and on the prehistory of his notorious group of expropriators. As for my sources, there is the considerable problem that the papers of the Transcaucasian RSDWP of the years in question are most likely lost.
Israelis should remember the claims filed by Jews against the expropriators of their property in Europe.
Orwell argues in The Road to Wigan Pier, for example, that those on the Left needed to talk less "about 'class consciousness,' 'expropriation of the expropriators,' 'bourgeois ideology,' and 'proletarian solidarity,' not to mention the sacred sisters, thesis, antithesis and synthesis; and more about justice, liberty, and the plight of the unemployed" (214).
Lefebvre implies that May '68 was an attempt to make good on the failed promises of that earlier, partial liberation, which had succeeded in removing the foreign invader but not the national expropriators. But of course, as he states in The Explosion, the strongest echoes are those of the Paris Commune of 1871.